Cell lineage distribution atlas of the human stomach reveals heterogeneous gland populations in the gastric antrum

Eunyoung Choi, Joseph T. Roland, Brittney J. Barlow, Ryan O'Neal, Amy E. Rich, Ki Taek Nam, Chanjuan Shi, James R. Goldenring

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

48 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: The glands of the stomach body and antral mucosa contain a complex compendium of cell lineages. In lower mammals, the distribution of oxyntic glands and antral glands define the anatomical regions within the stomach. We examined in detail the distribution of the full range of cell lineages within the human stomach.

Design: We determined the distribution of gastric gland cell lineages with specific immunocytochemical markers in entire stomach specimens from three non-obese organ donors.

Results: The anatomical body and antrum of the human stomach were defined by the presence of ghrelin and gastrin cells, respectively. Concentrations of somatostatin cells were observed in the proximal stomach. Parietal cells were seen in all glands of the body of the stomach as well as in over 50% of antral glands. MIST1 expressing chief cells were predominantly observed in the body although individual glands of the antrum also showed MIST1 expressing chief cells. While classically described antral glands were observed with gastrin cells and deep antral mucous cells without any parietal cells, we also observed a substantial population of mixed type glands containing both parietal cells and G cells throughout the antrum.

Conclusions: Enteroendocrine cells show distinct patterns of localisation in the human stomach. The existence of antral glands with mixed cell lineages indicates that human antral glands may be functionally chimeric with glands assembled from multiple distinct stem cell populations.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1711-1720
Number of pages10
JournalGut
Volume63
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014 Nov 1

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Pyloric Antrum
Atlases
Cell Lineage
Stomach
Gastrin-Secreting Cells
Population
Enteroendocrine Cells
Ghrelin
Somatostatin-Secreting Cells
Gastric Mucosa
Antral
Human Body
Mammals
Mucous Membrane
Stem Cells
Tissue Donors

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

Choi, E., Roland, J. T., Barlow, B. J., O'Neal, R., Rich, A. E., Nam, K. T., ... Goldenring, J. R. (2014). Cell lineage distribution atlas of the human stomach reveals heterogeneous gland populations in the gastric antrum. Gut, 63(11), 1711-1720. https://doi.org/10.1136/gutjnl-2013-305964
Choi, Eunyoung ; Roland, Joseph T. ; Barlow, Brittney J. ; O'Neal, Ryan ; Rich, Amy E. ; Nam, Ki Taek ; Shi, Chanjuan ; Goldenring, James R. / Cell lineage distribution atlas of the human stomach reveals heterogeneous gland populations in the gastric antrum. In: Gut. 2014 ; Vol. 63, No. 11. pp. 1711-1720.
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abstract = "Objective: The glands of the stomach body and antral mucosa contain a complex compendium of cell lineages. In lower mammals, the distribution of oxyntic glands and antral glands define the anatomical regions within the stomach. We examined in detail the distribution of the full range of cell lineages within the human stomach.Design: We determined the distribution of gastric gland cell lineages with specific immunocytochemical markers in entire stomach specimens from three non-obese organ donors.Results: The anatomical body and antrum of the human stomach were defined by the presence of ghrelin and gastrin cells, respectively. Concentrations of somatostatin cells were observed in the proximal stomach. Parietal cells were seen in all glands of the body of the stomach as well as in over 50{\%} of antral glands. MIST1 expressing chief cells were predominantly observed in the body although individual glands of the antrum also showed MIST1 expressing chief cells. While classically described antral glands were observed with gastrin cells and deep antral mucous cells without any parietal cells, we also observed a substantial population of mixed type glands containing both parietal cells and G cells throughout the antrum.Conclusions: Enteroendocrine cells show distinct patterns of localisation in the human stomach. The existence of antral glands with mixed cell lineages indicates that human antral glands may be functionally chimeric with glands assembled from multiple distinct stem cell populations.",
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Choi, E, Roland, JT, Barlow, BJ, O'Neal, R, Rich, AE, Nam, KT, Shi, C & Goldenring, JR 2014, 'Cell lineage distribution atlas of the human stomach reveals heterogeneous gland populations in the gastric antrum', Gut, vol. 63, no. 11, pp. 1711-1720. https://doi.org/10.1136/gutjnl-2013-305964

Cell lineage distribution atlas of the human stomach reveals heterogeneous gland populations in the gastric antrum. / Choi, Eunyoung; Roland, Joseph T.; Barlow, Brittney J.; O'Neal, Ryan; Rich, Amy E.; Nam, Ki Taek; Shi, Chanjuan; Goldenring, James R.

In: Gut, Vol. 63, No. 11, 01.11.2014, p. 1711-1720.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - Cell lineage distribution atlas of the human stomach reveals heterogeneous gland populations in the gastric antrum

AU - Choi, Eunyoung

AU - Roland, Joseph T.

AU - Barlow, Brittney J.

AU - O'Neal, Ryan

AU - Rich, Amy E.

AU - Nam, Ki Taek

AU - Shi, Chanjuan

AU - Goldenring, James R.

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N2 - Objective: The glands of the stomach body and antral mucosa contain a complex compendium of cell lineages. In lower mammals, the distribution of oxyntic glands and antral glands define the anatomical regions within the stomach. We examined in detail the distribution of the full range of cell lineages within the human stomach.Design: We determined the distribution of gastric gland cell lineages with specific immunocytochemical markers in entire stomach specimens from three non-obese organ donors.Results: The anatomical body and antrum of the human stomach were defined by the presence of ghrelin and gastrin cells, respectively. Concentrations of somatostatin cells were observed in the proximal stomach. Parietal cells were seen in all glands of the body of the stomach as well as in over 50% of antral glands. MIST1 expressing chief cells were predominantly observed in the body although individual glands of the antrum also showed MIST1 expressing chief cells. While classically described antral glands were observed with gastrin cells and deep antral mucous cells without any parietal cells, we also observed a substantial population of mixed type glands containing both parietal cells and G cells throughout the antrum.Conclusions: Enteroendocrine cells show distinct patterns of localisation in the human stomach. The existence of antral glands with mixed cell lineages indicates that human antral glands may be functionally chimeric with glands assembled from multiple distinct stem cell populations.

AB - Objective: The glands of the stomach body and antral mucosa contain a complex compendium of cell lineages. In lower mammals, the distribution of oxyntic glands and antral glands define the anatomical regions within the stomach. We examined in detail the distribution of the full range of cell lineages within the human stomach.Design: We determined the distribution of gastric gland cell lineages with specific immunocytochemical markers in entire stomach specimens from three non-obese organ donors.Results: The anatomical body and antrum of the human stomach were defined by the presence of ghrelin and gastrin cells, respectively. Concentrations of somatostatin cells were observed in the proximal stomach. Parietal cells were seen in all glands of the body of the stomach as well as in over 50% of antral glands. MIST1 expressing chief cells were predominantly observed in the body although individual glands of the antrum also showed MIST1 expressing chief cells. While classically described antral glands were observed with gastrin cells and deep antral mucous cells without any parietal cells, we also observed a substantial population of mixed type glands containing both parietal cells and G cells throughout the antrum.Conclusions: Enteroendocrine cells show distinct patterns of localisation in the human stomach. The existence of antral glands with mixed cell lineages indicates that human antral glands may be functionally chimeric with glands assembled from multiple distinct stem cell populations.

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