Cerebral microbleeds in patients with dementia with lewy bodies and Parkinson disease dementia

S. W. Kim, S. J. Chung, Y. S. Oh, J. H. Yoon, M. K. Sunwoo, J. Y. Hong, J. S. Kim, philhyu Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The burden of amyloid β is greater in patients with dementia with Lewy bodies than in those with Parkinson disease dementia, and an increased amyloid β load is closely related to a higher incidence of cerebral microbleeds. Here, we investigated the prevalence and topography of cerebral microbleeds in patients with dementia with Lewy bodies and those with Parkinson disease dementia to examine whether cerebral microbleeds are more prevalent in patients with dementia with Lewy bodies than in those with Parkinson disease dementia. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study population consisted of 42 patients with dementia with Lewy bodies, 88 patients with Parkinson disease dementia, and 35 controls who underwent brain MR imaging with gradient recalled-echo. Cerebral microbleeds were classified as deep, lobar, or infratentorial. RESULTS: The frequency of cerebral microbleeds was significantly greater in patients with dementia with Lewy bodies (45.2%) than in those with Parkinson disease dementia (26.1%) or in healthy controls (17.1%; P = .017). Lobar cerebral microbleeds were observed more frequently in the dementia with Lewy bodies group (40.5%) than in the Parkinson disease dementia (17%; P=.004) or healthy control (8.6%; P = .001) group, whereas the frequencies of deep and infratentorial cerebral microbleeds did not differ among the 3 groups. Logistic regression analyses revealed that, compared with the healthy control group, the dementia with Lewy bodies group was significantly associated with the presence of lobar cerebral microbleeds after adjusting for age, sex, nonlobar cerebral microbleeds, white matter hyperintensities, and other vascular risk factors (odds ratio, 4.39 [95% CI, 1.27-15.25]). However, compared with the healthy control group, the Parkinson disease dementia group was not significantly associated with lobar cerebral microbleeds. CONCLUSIONS: This study showed that patients with dementia with Lewy bodies had a greater burden of cerebral microbleeds and exhibited a lobar predominance of cerebral microbleeds than did patients with Parkinson disease dementia.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1642-1647
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Neuroradiology
Volume36
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015 Sep 1

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Lewy Body Disease
Parkinson Disease
Dementia
Amyloid
Control Groups
Neuroimaging
Logistic Models
Odds Ratio
Regression Analysis
Incidence

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Kim, S. W. ; Chung, S. J. ; Oh, Y. S. ; Yoon, J. H. ; Sunwoo, M. K. ; Hong, J. Y. ; Kim, J. S. ; Lee, philhyu. / Cerebral microbleeds in patients with dementia with lewy bodies and Parkinson disease dementia. In: American Journal of Neuroradiology. 2015 ; Vol. 36, No. 9. pp. 1642-1647.
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abstract = "BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The burden of amyloid β is greater in patients with dementia with Lewy bodies than in those with Parkinson disease dementia, and an increased amyloid β load is closely related to a higher incidence of cerebral microbleeds. Here, we investigated the prevalence and topography of cerebral microbleeds in patients with dementia with Lewy bodies and those with Parkinson disease dementia to examine whether cerebral microbleeds are more prevalent in patients with dementia with Lewy bodies than in those with Parkinson disease dementia. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study population consisted of 42 patients with dementia with Lewy bodies, 88 patients with Parkinson disease dementia, and 35 controls who underwent brain MR imaging with gradient recalled-echo. Cerebral microbleeds were classified as deep, lobar, or infratentorial. RESULTS: The frequency of cerebral microbleeds was significantly greater in patients with dementia with Lewy bodies (45.2{\%}) than in those with Parkinson disease dementia (26.1{\%}) or in healthy controls (17.1{\%}; P = .017). Lobar cerebral microbleeds were observed more frequently in the dementia with Lewy bodies group (40.5{\%}) than in the Parkinson disease dementia (17{\%}; P=.004) or healthy control (8.6{\%}; P = .001) group, whereas the frequencies of deep and infratentorial cerebral microbleeds did not differ among the 3 groups. Logistic regression analyses revealed that, compared with the healthy control group, the dementia with Lewy bodies group was significantly associated with the presence of lobar cerebral microbleeds after adjusting for age, sex, nonlobar cerebral microbleeds, white matter hyperintensities, and other vascular risk factors (odds ratio, 4.39 [95{\%} CI, 1.27-15.25]). However, compared with the healthy control group, the Parkinson disease dementia group was not significantly associated with lobar cerebral microbleeds. CONCLUSIONS: This study showed that patients with dementia with Lewy bodies had a greater burden of cerebral microbleeds and exhibited a lobar predominance of cerebral microbleeds than did patients with Parkinson disease dementia.",
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Cerebral microbleeds in patients with dementia with lewy bodies and Parkinson disease dementia. / Kim, S. W.; Chung, S. J.; Oh, Y. S.; Yoon, J. H.; Sunwoo, M. K.; Hong, J. Y.; Kim, J. S.; Lee, philhyu.

In: American Journal of Neuroradiology, Vol. 36, No. 9, 01.09.2015, p. 1642-1647.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - Cerebral microbleeds in patients with dementia with lewy bodies and Parkinson disease dementia

AU - Kim, S. W.

AU - Chung, S. J.

AU - Oh, Y. S.

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N2 - BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The burden of amyloid β is greater in patients with dementia with Lewy bodies than in those with Parkinson disease dementia, and an increased amyloid β load is closely related to a higher incidence of cerebral microbleeds. Here, we investigated the prevalence and topography of cerebral microbleeds in patients with dementia with Lewy bodies and those with Parkinson disease dementia to examine whether cerebral microbleeds are more prevalent in patients with dementia with Lewy bodies than in those with Parkinson disease dementia. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study population consisted of 42 patients with dementia with Lewy bodies, 88 patients with Parkinson disease dementia, and 35 controls who underwent brain MR imaging with gradient recalled-echo. Cerebral microbleeds were classified as deep, lobar, or infratentorial. RESULTS: The frequency of cerebral microbleeds was significantly greater in patients with dementia with Lewy bodies (45.2%) than in those with Parkinson disease dementia (26.1%) or in healthy controls (17.1%; P = .017). Lobar cerebral microbleeds were observed more frequently in the dementia with Lewy bodies group (40.5%) than in the Parkinson disease dementia (17%; P=.004) or healthy control (8.6%; P = .001) group, whereas the frequencies of deep and infratentorial cerebral microbleeds did not differ among the 3 groups. Logistic regression analyses revealed that, compared with the healthy control group, the dementia with Lewy bodies group was significantly associated with the presence of lobar cerebral microbleeds after adjusting for age, sex, nonlobar cerebral microbleeds, white matter hyperintensities, and other vascular risk factors (odds ratio, 4.39 [95% CI, 1.27-15.25]). However, compared with the healthy control group, the Parkinson disease dementia group was not significantly associated with lobar cerebral microbleeds. CONCLUSIONS: This study showed that patients with dementia with Lewy bodies had a greater burden of cerebral microbleeds and exhibited a lobar predominance of cerebral microbleeds than did patients with Parkinson disease dementia.

AB - BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The burden of amyloid β is greater in patients with dementia with Lewy bodies than in those with Parkinson disease dementia, and an increased amyloid β load is closely related to a higher incidence of cerebral microbleeds. Here, we investigated the prevalence and topography of cerebral microbleeds in patients with dementia with Lewy bodies and those with Parkinson disease dementia to examine whether cerebral microbleeds are more prevalent in patients with dementia with Lewy bodies than in those with Parkinson disease dementia. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study population consisted of 42 patients with dementia with Lewy bodies, 88 patients with Parkinson disease dementia, and 35 controls who underwent brain MR imaging with gradient recalled-echo. Cerebral microbleeds were classified as deep, lobar, or infratentorial. RESULTS: The frequency of cerebral microbleeds was significantly greater in patients with dementia with Lewy bodies (45.2%) than in those with Parkinson disease dementia (26.1%) or in healthy controls (17.1%; P = .017). Lobar cerebral microbleeds were observed more frequently in the dementia with Lewy bodies group (40.5%) than in the Parkinson disease dementia (17%; P=.004) or healthy control (8.6%; P = .001) group, whereas the frequencies of deep and infratentorial cerebral microbleeds did not differ among the 3 groups. Logistic regression analyses revealed that, compared with the healthy control group, the dementia with Lewy bodies group was significantly associated with the presence of lobar cerebral microbleeds after adjusting for age, sex, nonlobar cerebral microbleeds, white matter hyperintensities, and other vascular risk factors (odds ratio, 4.39 [95% CI, 1.27-15.25]). However, compared with the healthy control group, the Parkinson disease dementia group was not significantly associated with lobar cerebral microbleeds. CONCLUSIONS: This study showed that patients with dementia with Lewy bodies had a greater burden of cerebral microbleeds and exhibited a lobar predominance of cerebral microbleeds than did patients with Parkinson disease dementia.

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