Changes in hyolaryngeal movement and swallowing function after neuromuscular electrical stimulation in patients with dysphagia

Hoo Young Lee, Ji Seong Hong, Kil Chan Lee, Yoon Kyum Shin, Sung-Rae Cho

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective To investigate immediate changes in hyolaryngeal movement and swallowing function after a cycle of neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) on both submental and throat regions and submental placement alone in patients with dysphagia.Methods Fifteen patients with dysphagia were recruited. First, videofluoroscopic swallowing study (VFSS) was performed before NMES. All patients thereafter received a cycle of NMES by 2 methods of electrode placement: 1) both submental and throat regions and 2) submental placement alone concomitant with VFSS. The Penetration-Aspiration Score (PAS) and the NIH-Swallowing Safety Scale (NIH-SSS) were measured for swallowing function.Results During swallowing, hyolaryngeal descent significantly occurred by NMES on both submental and throat regions, and anterior displacement of hyolaryngeal complex was significant on submental placement alone. NMES on submental placement alone did not change the PAS and NIH-SSS. However, NMES on both submental and throat regions significantly reduced the NIH-SSS, although it did not change the PAS. Patients with no brainstem lesion and with dysphagia duration of <3 months showed significantly improved the NIH-SSS.Conclusion Immediate hyolaryngeal movement was paradoxically depressed after NMES on both submental and throat regions with significant reductions in the NIH-SSS but not the PAS, suggesting improvement in pharyngeal peristalsis and cricopharyngeal functions at the esophageal entry rather than decreased aspiration and penetration. The results also suggested that patients with dysphagia should be carefully screened when determining motor-level NMES.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)199-209
Number of pages11
JournalAnnals of Rehabilitation Medicine
Volume39
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015 Jan 1

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Deglutition
Deglutition Disorders
Electric Stimulation
Pharynx
Safety
Peristalsis
Brain Stem
Electrodes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Rehabilitation

Cite this

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title = "Changes in hyolaryngeal movement and swallowing function after neuromuscular electrical stimulation in patients with dysphagia",
abstract = "Objective To investigate immediate changes in hyolaryngeal movement and swallowing function after a cycle of neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) on both submental and throat regions and submental placement alone in patients with dysphagia.Methods Fifteen patients with dysphagia were recruited. First, videofluoroscopic swallowing study (VFSS) was performed before NMES. All patients thereafter received a cycle of NMES by 2 methods of electrode placement: 1) both submental and throat regions and 2) submental placement alone concomitant with VFSS. The Penetration-Aspiration Score (PAS) and the NIH-Swallowing Safety Scale (NIH-SSS) were measured for swallowing function.Results During swallowing, hyolaryngeal descent significantly occurred by NMES on both submental and throat regions, and anterior displacement of hyolaryngeal complex was significant on submental placement alone. NMES on submental placement alone did not change the PAS and NIH-SSS. However, NMES on both submental and throat regions significantly reduced the NIH-SSS, although it did not change the PAS. Patients with no brainstem lesion and with dysphagia duration of <3 months showed significantly improved the NIH-SSS.Conclusion Immediate hyolaryngeal movement was paradoxically depressed after NMES on both submental and throat regions with significant reductions in the NIH-SSS but not the PAS, suggesting improvement in pharyngeal peristalsis and cricopharyngeal functions at the esophageal entry rather than decreased aspiration and penetration. The results also suggested that patients with dysphagia should be carefully screened when determining motor-level NMES.",
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Changes in hyolaryngeal movement and swallowing function after neuromuscular electrical stimulation in patients with dysphagia. / Lee, Hoo Young; Hong, Ji Seong; Lee, Kil Chan; Shin, Yoon Kyum; Cho, Sung-Rae.

In: Annals of Rehabilitation Medicine, Vol. 39, No. 2, 01.01.2015, p. 199-209.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Lee, Kil Chan

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AU - Cho, Sung-Rae

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N2 - Objective To investigate immediate changes in hyolaryngeal movement and swallowing function after a cycle of neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) on both submental and throat regions and submental placement alone in patients with dysphagia.Methods Fifteen patients with dysphagia were recruited. First, videofluoroscopic swallowing study (VFSS) was performed before NMES. All patients thereafter received a cycle of NMES by 2 methods of electrode placement: 1) both submental and throat regions and 2) submental placement alone concomitant with VFSS. The Penetration-Aspiration Score (PAS) and the NIH-Swallowing Safety Scale (NIH-SSS) were measured for swallowing function.Results During swallowing, hyolaryngeal descent significantly occurred by NMES on both submental and throat regions, and anterior displacement of hyolaryngeal complex was significant on submental placement alone. NMES on submental placement alone did not change the PAS and NIH-SSS. However, NMES on both submental and throat regions significantly reduced the NIH-SSS, although it did not change the PAS. Patients with no brainstem lesion and with dysphagia duration of <3 months showed significantly improved the NIH-SSS.Conclusion Immediate hyolaryngeal movement was paradoxically depressed after NMES on both submental and throat regions with significant reductions in the NIH-SSS but not the PAS, suggesting improvement in pharyngeal peristalsis and cricopharyngeal functions at the esophageal entry rather than decreased aspiration and penetration. The results also suggested that patients with dysphagia should be carefully screened when determining motor-level NMES.

AB - Objective To investigate immediate changes in hyolaryngeal movement and swallowing function after a cycle of neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) on both submental and throat regions and submental placement alone in patients with dysphagia.Methods Fifteen patients with dysphagia were recruited. First, videofluoroscopic swallowing study (VFSS) was performed before NMES. All patients thereafter received a cycle of NMES by 2 methods of electrode placement: 1) both submental and throat regions and 2) submental placement alone concomitant with VFSS. The Penetration-Aspiration Score (PAS) and the NIH-Swallowing Safety Scale (NIH-SSS) were measured for swallowing function.Results During swallowing, hyolaryngeal descent significantly occurred by NMES on both submental and throat regions, and anterior displacement of hyolaryngeal complex was significant on submental placement alone. NMES on submental placement alone did not change the PAS and NIH-SSS. However, NMES on both submental and throat regions significantly reduced the NIH-SSS, although it did not change the PAS. Patients with no brainstem lesion and with dysphagia duration of <3 months showed significantly improved the NIH-SSS.Conclusion Immediate hyolaryngeal movement was paradoxically depressed after NMES on both submental and throat regions with significant reductions in the NIH-SSS but not the PAS, suggesting improvement in pharyngeal peristalsis and cricopharyngeal functions at the esophageal entry rather than decreased aspiration and penetration. The results also suggested that patients with dysphagia should be carefully screened when determining motor-level NMES.

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