Changes in the blood-brain barrier status closely correlate with the rate of disease progression in patients with multiple system atrophy: A longitudinal study

Ji E. Lee, Sook K. Song, Jin Yong Hong, Mun Kyung Sunwoo, Hyun Jung Park, Young H. Sohn, Phil Hyu Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The pathomechanisms responsible for disease progression in multiple system atrophy are unknown. The blood-brain barrier status may act as a modifier of disease progression in neurodegenerative diseases. Methods: We evaluated the 12-month longitudinal change of the blood-brain barrier in 16 multiple system atrophy patients and analyzed its correlation with changes in clinical severity. Results: The baseline blood-brain barrier index did not correlate significantly with change in disease severity. However, changes in the blood-brain barrier indices over 12 months had significant positive correlations with changes in total unified multiple system atrophy rating scale (r = 0.56, p = 0.024) and part II scores (r = 0.56, p = 0.025). These correlation coefficients were higher after adjusting for baseline neurological deficits. Conclusions: These data suggest that changes in the blood-brain barrier status are closely coupled with the rate of disease progression in multiple system atrophy, potentially acting as a contributor to disease progression.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)450-452
Number of pages3
JournalParkinsonism and Related Disorders
Volume19
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013 Apr 1

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Multiple System Atrophy
Blood-Brain Barrier
Longitudinal Studies
Disease Progression
Neurodegenerative Diseases

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neurology
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Lee, Ji E. ; Song, Sook K. ; Hong, Jin Yong ; Sunwoo, Mun Kyung ; Park, Hyun Jung ; Sohn, Young H. ; Lee, Phil Hyu. / Changes in the blood-brain barrier status closely correlate with the rate of disease progression in patients with multiple system atrophy : A longitudinal study. In: Parkinsonism and Related Disorders. 2013 ; Vol. 19, No. 4. pp. 450-452.
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Changes in the blood-brain barrier status closely correlate with the rate of disease progression in patients with multiple system atrophy : A longitudinal study. / Lee, Ji E.; Song, Sook K.; Hong, Jin Yong; Sunwoo, Mun Kyung; Park, Hyun Jung; Sohn, Young H.; Lee, Phil Hyu.

In: Parkinsonism and Related Disorders, Vol. 19, No. 4, 01.04.2013, p. 450-452.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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