Characterization, in vitro cytotoxicity assessment, and in vivo visualization of multimodal, RITC-labeled, silica-coated magnetic nanoparticles for labeling human cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells

Ki Soo Park, Jinsung Tae, Bongkum Choi, Young Seok Kim, Cheol Moon, Sa Hyun Kim, Han Sin Lee, Jinhyun Kim, Junsung Kim, Jaeberm Park, Jung Hee Lee, Jongeun Lee, Jae Won Joh, Sungjoo Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Live imaging is a powerful technique that can be used to characterize the fate and location of stem cells in animal models. Here we investigated the characteristics and in vitro cytotoxicity of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) labeled with silica-coated magnetic nanoparticles incorporating rhodamine B isothiocyanate, MNPs@SiO 2 (RITC). We also conducted various in vivo-uptake tests with nanoparticle-labeled human MSCs. MNPs@SiO 2 (RITC) showed photostability against ultraviolet light exposure and were nontoxic to human MSCs, based on the MTT, apoptosis, and cell cycle arrest assays. In addition, MNPs@SiO 2 (RITC) did not affect the surface phenotype or morphology of human MSCs. We also demonstrated that MNPs@SiO 2 (RITC) have stable retention properties in MSCs in vitro. Furthermore, using optical and magnetic resonance imaging, we successfully detected a visible signal from labeled human MSCs that were transplanted into NOD.CB17-Prkdc SCID (NOD-SCID) mice. These results demonstrate that MNPs@SiO 2 (RITC) are biocompatible and useful tools for human MSC labeling and bioimaging. From the Clinical Editor: The characteristics and in vitro cytotoxicity of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) labeled with silica-coated magnetic nanoparticles incorporating rhodamine B isothiocyanate, RITC were investigated in this study. RITC showed photostability against ultraviolet light exposure and was nontoxic to human MSCs. Using both optical and magnetic resonance imaging, successful detection of signal from labeled human MSCs transplanted into mice is demonstrated.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)263-276
Number of pages14
JournalNanomedicine: Nanotechnology, Biology, and Medicine
Volume6
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010 Apr 1

Fingerprint

Cytotoxicity
Stem cells
Mesenchymal Stromal Cells
Fetal Blood
Silicon Dioxide
Nanoparticles
Labeling
Blood
Visualization
Silica
Ultraviolet Rays
Magnetic resonance
Imaging techniques
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
In Vitro Techniques
Inbred NOD Mouse
SCID Mice
Cell Cycle Checkpoints
Cell death
Stem Cells

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Bioengineering
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Materials Science(all)
  • Pharmaceutical Science

Cite this

Park, Ki Soo ; Tae, Jinsung ; Choi, Bongkum ; Kim, Young Seok ; Moon, Cheol ; Kim, Sa Hyun ; Lee, Han Sin ; Kim, Jinhyun ; Kim, Junsung ; Park, Jaeberm ; Lee, Jung Hee ; Lee, Jongeun ; Joh, Jae Won ; Kim, Sungjoo. / Characterization, in vitro cytotoxicity assessment, and in vivo visualization of multimodal, RITC-labeled, silica-coated magnetic nanoparticles for labeling human cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells. In: Nanomedicine: Nanotechnology, Biology, and Medicine. 2010 ; Vol. 6, No. 2. pp. 263-276.
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abstract = "Live imaging is a powerful technique that can be used to characterize the fate and location of stem cells in animal models. Here we investigated the characteristics and in vitro cytotoxicity of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) labeled with silica-coated magnetic nanoparticles incorporating rhodamine B isothiocyanate, MNPs@SiO 2 (RITC). We also conducted various in vivo-uptake tests with nanoparticle-labeled human MSCs. MNPs@SiO 2 (RITC) showed photostability against ultraviolet light exposure and were nontoxic to human MSCs, based on the MTT, apoptosis, and cell cycle arrest assays. In addition, MNPs@SiO 2 (RITC) did not affect the surface phenotype or morphology of human MSCs. We also demonstrated that MNPs@SiO 2 (RITC) have stable retention properties in MSCs in vitro. Furthermore, using optical and magnetic resonance imaging, we successfully detected a visible signal from labeled human MSCs that were transplanted into NOD.CB17-Prkdc SCID (NOD-SCID) mice. These results demonstrate that MNPs@SiO 2 (RITC) are biocompatible and useful tools for human MSC labeling and bioimaging. From the Clinical Editor: The characteristics and in vitro cytotoxicity of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) labeled with silica-coated magnetic nanoparticles incorporating rhodamine B isothiocyanate, RITC were investigated in this study. RITC showed photostability against ultraviolet light exposure and was nontoxic to human MSCs. Using both optical and magnetic resonance imaging, successful detection of signal from labeled human MSCs transplanted into mice is demonstrated.",
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Characterization, in vitro cytotoxicity assessment, and in vivo visualization of multimodal, RITC-labeled, silica-coated magnetic nanoparticles for labeling human cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells. / Park, Ki Soo; Tae, Jinsung; Choi, Bongkum; Kim, Young Seok; Moon, Cheol; Kim, Sa Hyun; Lee, Han Sin; Kim, Jinhyun; Kim, Junsung; Park, Jaeberm; Lee, Jung Hee; Lee, Jongeun; Joh, Jae Won; Kim, Sungjoo.

In: Nanomedicine: Nanotechnology, Biology, and Medicine, Vol. 6, No. 2, 01.04.2010, p. 263-276.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - Characterization, in vitro cytotoxicity assessment, and in vivo visualization of multimodal, RITC-labeled, silica-coated magnetic nanoparticles for labeling human cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells

AU - Park, Ki Soo

AU - Tae, Jinsung

AU - Choi, Bongkum

AU - Kim, Young Seok

AU - Moon, Cheol

AU - Kim, Sa Hyun

AU - Lee, Han Sin

AU - Kim, Jinhyun

AU - Kim, Junsung

AU - Park, Jaeberm

AU - Lee, Jung Hee

AU - Lee, Jongeun

AU - Joh, Jae Won

AU - Kim, Sungjoo

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