Characterization of heating, movement and visualization of magnetic nanoparticles for biomedical applications

Venkatasubramaniam S. Kalambur, Bumsoo Han, Byeong Su Kim, T. Andrew Taton, John C. Bischof

Research output: Contribution to journalConference article

Abstract

Magnetic nanoparticles can be used for a variety of biomedical applications. They can be used in the targeted delivery of therapeutic agents, as contrast agents in MR imaging and in the hyperthermic treatment of cancers. Previous studies using these particles have not dealt with a quantitative characterization of movement and heating of these particles in biological environments. In the present study, the thermal characteristics of magnetic nanoparticles in water and collagen were investigated. In other studies, the movement of these particles in collagen in a known magnetic field was studied; infra-red (IR) imaging was used to visualize these particles in vitro. The results show that the amount of temperature rise increases with the concentration of nanoparticles regardless of the microenvironments. However, the amount of heating in collagen is significantly less than water at the same nanoparticle concentration. IR imaging can be used to visualize these particles in vitro over a wide range of concentrations of these nanoparticles.

Original languageEnglish
Article numberIMECE2004-61604
Pages (from-to)95-96
Number of pages2
JournalAdvances in Bioengineering, BED
Publication statusPublished - 2004 Jan 1
Event2004 ASME International Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exposition, IMECE - Anaheim, CA, United States
Duration: 2004 Nov 132004 Nov 19

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Visualization
Nanoparticles
Heating
Collagen
Infrared imaging
Water
Magnetic fields
Imaging techniques
Temperature

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Engineering(all)

Cite this

Kalambur, Venkatasubramaniam S. ; Han, Bumsoo ; Kim, Byeong Su ; Taton, T. Andrew ; Bischof, John C. / Characterization of heating, movement and visualization of magnetic nanoparticles for biomedical applications. In: Advances in Bioengineering, BED. 2004 ; pp. 95-96.
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Characterization of heating, movement and visualization of magnetic nanoparticles for biomedical applications. / Kalambur, Venkatasubramaniam S.; Han, Bumsoo; Kim, Byeong Su; Taton, T. Andrew; Bischof, John C.

In: Advances in Bioengineering, BED, 01.01.2004, p. 95-96.

Research output: Contribution to journalConference article

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T1 - Characterization of heating, movement and visualization of magnetic nanoparticles for biomedical applications

AU - Kalambur, Venkatasubramaniam S.

AU - Han, Bumsoo

AU - Kim, Byeong Su

AU - Taton, T. Andrew

AU - Bischof, John C.

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