Children With Disability Are More at Risk of Violence Victimization

Evidence From a Study of School-Aged Chinese Children

Edward Ko Ling Chan, Clifton R. Emery, Patrick Ip

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Although research tends to focus on whether children with disability are more at risk of violence victimization, conclusive evidence on the association, especially in non-Western settings, is lacking. Using a large and representative sample of school-aged children in Hong Kong (N = 5,841, aged 9-18 years), this study aims to fill the research gap by providing reliable estimates of the prevalence of disability and the direct and indirect experiences of violence among children with disability. The study also compares the prevalence of child maltreatment, parental intimate partner violence (IPV), and in-law conflict to explore the factors related to the association between disability and violence victimization. The prevalence of disability among children was about 6%. Children with disability were more likely to report victimization than those without disability: 32% to 60% of the former had experienced child maltreatment, and 12% to 46% of them had witnessed IPV between parents or in-law conflict. The results of a logistic regression showed that disability increased the risk of lifetime physical maltreatment by 1.6 times. Furthermore, low levels of parental education and paternal unemployment were risk factors for lifetime child maltreatment. The risk of child maltreatment could have an almost sixfold increase when the child had also witnessed other types of family violence. Possible explanations and implications of the findings are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1026-1046
Number of pages21
JournalJournal of Interpersonal Violence
Volume31
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016 Mar 1

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Crime Victims
Child Abuse
Disabled Children
Violence
Domestic Violence
Unemployment
Hong Kong
Research
Parents
Logistic Models
Education
Conflict (Psychology)
Intimate Partner Violence

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Applied Psychology

Cite this

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Children With Disability Are More at Risk of Violence Victimization : Evidence From a Study of School-Aged Chinese Children. / Chan, Edward Ko Ling; Emery, Clifton R.; Ip, Patrick.

In: Journal of Interpersonal Violence, Vol. 31, No. 6, 01.03.2016, p. 1026-1046.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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