Clash of Cultures? German Expatriates' Work-Life Boundary Adjustment in South Korea

Anna Katharina Bader, Fabian Jintae Froese, Albert Kraeh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Managing work-life balance abroad is considered as one of the key challenges associated with expatriation. That is particularly true when the enactment of the work-life boundaries of expatriates' home and host countries diverge. Drawing from boundary theory, we investigate whether and how expatriates experience cross-cultural challenges in terms of their work-life boundaries abroad. We interviewed 28 German expatriates in South Korea because both cultures differ substantially in terms of their preferred work-life boundaries. Our study shows that perceived work-life boundary pressures in the foreign environment and willingness to adjust to the local work-life boundary culture vary substantially among expatriates. Based on a function of these two forces, we develop a typology of four work-life boundary adjustment styles and relate them to work-life balance satisfaction. Furthermore, we identify individual and organizational factors that influence expatriates' work-life boundary adjustment styles. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)357-374
Number of pages18
JournalEuropean Management Review
Volume15
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018 Sep 1

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Expatriates
South Korea
Work-life balance
Host country
Organizational factors
Willingness
Home country
Individual factors
Enactment
Expatriation

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Business and International Management
  • Strategy and Management

Cite this

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Clash of Cultures? German Expatriates' Work-Life Boundary Adjustment in South Korea. / Bader, Anna Katharina; Froese, Fabian Jintae; Kraeh, Albert.

In: European Management Review, Vol. 15, No. 3, 01.09.2018, p. 357-374.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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