Clinical characteristics and genetic variations in early-onset atopic dermatitis patients

Beom Jun Kim, Hye Young Wang, Hyeyoung Lee, So Yeon Lee, Soo Jong Hong, Eung Ho Choi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Hereditary factors contribute to atopic dermatitis (AD) development. We developed the reverse blot hybridization assay (REBA) kit to simultaneously detect variations in skin barrier- and immune response-related genes prevalent in Korean AD patients. Objective: To identify genetic variations and clinical characteristics that could predict early AD development. Methods: We compared AD-related genetic variations between early-onset AD subjects and non-AD controls, and clinical characteristics and genetic variations between early- and late-onset AD subjects. We compared 28 early-onset AD subjects and 57 non-AD controls from a birth cohort and 108 early- (age ≤3 years) and 90 late-onset AD subjects and 189 non-AD controls from a university hospital. Genetic variations were detected via REBA. Results: There were no differences in AD-related genetic variation between early-onset AD subjects and non-AD controls in the birth cohort. When the birth cohort and hospital populations were combined, early-onset AD subjects and non-AD controls showed different frequencies of genetic variations of KLK7, SPINK5 1156, DEFB1, IL5RA, IL12RB1a, and IL12RB1b. No differences in the frequency of genetic variations were observed between early- and late-onset AD subjects. Immuno-globulin E positivity for house dust mites was prevalent in late-onset AD subjects. A family history of atopic diseases was associated with early-onset AD. Conclusion: No AD-related genetic variations could predict early AD development in Koreans, even though neonates with a family history of atopic diseases are likely to develop AD at ≤3 years of age. Environmental exposure may be more important than genetic variation in determining the onset age of AD.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)286-293
Number of pages8
JournalAnnals of Dermatology
Volume31
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019 Jan 1

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Atopic Dermatitis
Dermatitis
Contraception
Pyroglyphidae
Environmental Exposure
Globulins
Age of Onset

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Dermatology

Cite this

Jun Kim, Beom ; Wang, Hye Young ; Lee, Hyeyoung ; Lee, So Yeon ; Hong, Soo Jong ; Choi, Eung Ho. / Clinical characteristics and genetic variations in early-onset atopic dermatitis patients. In: Annals of Dermatology. 2019 ; Vol. 31, No. 3. pp. 286-293.
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abstract = "Background: Hereditary factors contribute to atopic dermatitis (AD) development. We developed the reverse blot hybridization assay (REBA) kit to simultaneously detect variations in skin barrier- and immune response-related genes prevalent in Korean AD patients. Objective: To identify genetic variations and clinical characteristics that could predict early AD development. Methods: We compared AD-related genetic variations between early-onset AD subjects and non-AD controls, and clinical characteristics and genetic variations between early- and late-onset AD subjects. We compared 28 early-onset AD subjects and 57 non-AD controls from a birth cohort and 108 early- (age ≤3 years) and 90 late-onset AD subjects and 189 non-AD controls from a university hospital. Genetic variations were detected via REBA. Results: There were no differences in AD-related genetic variation between early-onset AD subjects and non-AD controls in the birth cohort. When the birth cohort and hospital populations were combined, early-onset AD subjects and non-AD controls showed different frequencies of genetic variations of KLK7, SPINK5 1156, DEFB1, IL5RA, IL12RB1a, and IL12RB1b. No differences in the frequency of genetic variations were observed between early- and late-onset AD subjects. Immuno-globulin E positivity for house dust mites was prevalent in late-onset AD subjects. A family history of atopic diseases was associated with early-onset AD. Conclusion: No AD-related genetic variations could predict early AD development in Koreans, even though neonates with a family history of atopic diseases are likely to develop AD at ≤3 years of age. Environmental exposure may be more important than genetic variation in determining the onset age of AD.",
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Clinical characteristics and genetic variations in early-onset atopic dermatitis patients. / Jun Kim, Beom; Wang, Hye Young; Lee, Hyeyoung; Lee, So Yeon; Hong, Soo Jong; Choi, Eung Ho.

In: Annals of Dermatology, Vol. 31, No. 3, 01.01.2019, p. 286-293.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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