Clinical Outcomes after Intentional Replantation of Periodontally Involved Teeth

Sin Yeon Cho, Seung Jong Lee, EuiSeong Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction Periodontal involvement has been thought to be a contraindication for intentional replantation. This retrospective study aimed to assess clinical outcomes after intentional replantation of teeth with periodontal involvement and to explore potential predictors of outcomes. Methods Teeth with a history of intentional replantation between March 2000 and December 2014 and with 1 or 2 preoperative periodontal pockets ≥6 mm among 6 sites evaluated per tooth were included. A total of 103 teeth were included, and 74 teeth were followed up for more than 6 months. Outcomes were assessed as improved (a decrease in the number and depths of periodontal pockets and the size of periapical radiolucency and no external root resorption or sign/symptoms) or failed. Data were analyzed with Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and a Cox proportional regression model. Results Cumulative improved rates declined from 89% at 1 year to 68% at 4 years. A Cox proportional regression model identified the patient's age (P = .049; hazard ratio, 2.552) and the number of preoperative periodontal pockets with a depth ≥6 mm (P = .041; hazard ratio, 2.523) as predictors of outcomes in the replantation of periodontally involved teeth. Conclusions Periodontal involvement is not an absolute contraindication to intentional replantation. The teeth with 1 preoperative periodontal pocket ≥6 mm and the subjects aged ≤40 years had 2.5 times and 2.6 times lower probability of failure, respectively, than the teeth with 2 pockets and the subjects aged >40 years. Therefore, these factors need to be carefully considered for intentional replantation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)550-555
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Endodontics
Volume43
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017 Apr 1

Fingerprint

Replantation
Tooth
Periodontal Pocket
Tooth Replantation
Root Resorption
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Survival Analysis
Signs and Symptoms
Retrospective Studies

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Dentistry(all)

Cite this

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title = "Clinical Outcomes after Intentional Replantation of Periodontally Involved Teeth",
abstract = "Introduction Periodontal involvement has been thought to be a contraindication for intentional replantation. This retrospective study aimed to assess clinical outcomes after intentional replantation of teeth with periodontal involvement and to explore potential predictors of outcomes. Methods Teeth with a history of intentional replantation between March 2000 and December 2014 and with 1 or 2 preoperative periodontal pockets ≥6 mm among 6 sites evaluated per tooth were included. A total of 103 teeth were included, and 74 teeth were followed up for more than 6 months. Outcomes were assessed as improved (a decrease in the number and depths of periodontal pockets and the size of periapical radiolucency and no external root resorption or sign/symptoms) or failed. Data were analyzed with Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and a Cox proportional regression model. Results Cumulative improved rates declined from 89{\%} at 1 year to 68{\%} at 4 years. A Cox proportional regression model identified the patient's age (P = .049; hazard ratio, 2.552) and the number of preoperative periodontal pockets with a depth ≥6 mm (P = .041; hazard ratio, 2.523) as predictors of outcomes in the replantation of periodontally involved teeth. Conclusions Periodontal involvement is not an absolute contraindication to intentional replantation. The teeth with 1 preoperative periodontal pocket ≥6 mm and the subjects aged ≤40 years had 2.5 times and 2.6 times lower probability of failure, respectively, than the teeth with 2 pockets and the subjects aged >40 years. Therefore, these factors need to be carefully considered for intentional replantation.",
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Clinical Outcomes after Intentional Replantation of Periodontally Involved Teeth. / Cho, Sin Yeon; Lee, Seung Jong; Kim, EuiSeong.

In: Journal of Endodontics, Vol. 43, No. 4, 01.04.2017, p. 550-555.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Cho, Sin Yeon

AU - Lee, Seung Jong

AU - Kim, EuiSeong

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N2 - Introduction Periodontal involvement has been thought to be a contraindication for intentional replantation. This retrospective study aimed to assess clinical outcomes after intentional replantation of teeth with periodontal involvement and to explore potential predictors of outcomes. Methods Teeth with a history of intentional replantation between March 2000 and December 2014 and with 1 or 2 preoperative periodontal pockets ≥6 mm among 6 sites evaluated per tooth were included. A total of 103 teeth were included, and 74 teeth were followed up for more than 6 months. Outcomes were assessed as improved (a decrease in the number and depths of periodontal pockets and the size of periapical radiolucency and no external root resorption or sign/symptoms) or failed. Data were analyzed with Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and a Cox proportional regression model. Results Cumulative improved rates declined from 89% at 1 year to 68% at 4 years. A Cox proportional regression model identified the patient's age (P = .049; hazard ratio, 2.552) and the number of preoperative periodontal pockets with a depth ≥6 mm (P = .041; hazard ratio, 2.523) as predictors of outcomes in the replantation of periodontally involved teeth. Conclusions Periodontal involvement is not an absolute contraindication to intentional replantation. The teeth with 1 preoperative periodontal pocket ≥6 mm and the subjects aged ≤40 years had 2.5 times and 2.6 times lower probability of failure, respectively, than the teeth with 2 pockets and the subjects aged >40 years. Therefore, these factors need to be carefully considered for intentional replantation.

AB - Introduction Periodontal involvement has been thought to be a contraindication for intentional replantation. This retrospective study aimed to assess clinical outcomes after intentional replantation of teeth with periodontal involvement and to explore potential predictors of outcomes. Methods Teeth with a history of intentional replantation between March 2000 and December 2014 and with 1 or 2 preoperative periodontal pockets ≥6 mm among 6 sites evaluated per tooth were included. A total of 103 teeth were included, and 74 teeth were followed up for more than 6 months. Outcomes were assessed as improved (a decrease in the number and depths of periodontal pockets and the size of periapical radiolucency and no external root resorption or sign/symptoms) or failed. Data were analyzed with Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and a Cox proportional regression model. Results Cumulative improved rates declined from 89% at 1 year to 68% at 4 years. A Cox proportional regression model identified the patient's age (P = .049; hazard ratio, 2.552) and the number of preoperative periodontal pockets with a depth ≥6 mm (P = .041; hazard ratio, 2.523) as predictors of outcomes in the replantation of periodontally involved teeth. Conclusions Periodontal involvement is not an absolute contraindication to intentional replantation. The teeth with 1 preoperative periodontal pocket ≥6 mm and the subjects aged ≤40 years had 2.5 times and 2.6 times lower probability of failure, respectively, than the teeth with 2 pockets and the subjects aged >40 years. Therefore, these factors need to be carefully considered for intentional replantation.

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