Clinical Outcomes of an Optimized Prolate Ablation Procedure for Correcting Residual Refractive Errors Following Laser Surgery

Byunghoon Chung, Hun Lee, Bong Joon Choi, KyoungYul Seo, Eungkweon Kim, Dae Yune Kim, Tae-im Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to investigate the clinical efficacy of an optimized prolate ablation procedure for correcting residual refractive errors following laser surgery.

METHODS: We analyzed 24 eyes of 15 patients who underwent an optimized prolate ablation procedure for the correction of residual refractive errors following laser in situ keratomileusis, laser-assisted subepithelial keratectomy, or photorefractive keratectomy surgeries. Preoperative ophthalmic examinations were performed, and uncorrected distance visual acuity, corrected distance visual acuity, manifest refraction values (sphere, cylinder, and spherical equivalent), point spread function, modulation transfer function, corneal asphericity (Q value), ocular aberrations, and corneal haze measurements were obtained postoperatively at 1, 3, and 6 months.

RESULTS: Uncorrected distance visual acuity improved and refractive errors decreased significantly at 1, 3, and 6 months postoperatively. Total coma aberration increased at 3 and 6 months postoperatively, while changes in all other aberrations were not statistically significant. Similarly, no significant changes in point spread function were detected, but modulation transfer function increased significantly at the postoperative time points measured.

CONCLUSIONS: The optimized prolate ablation procedure was effective in terms of improving visual acuity and objective visual performance for the correction of persistent refractive errors following laser surgery.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)16-24
Number of pages9
JournalKorean journal of ophthalmology : KJO
Volume31
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017 Feb 1

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Phosmet
Refractive Errors
Laser Therapy
Visual Acuity
Laser-Assisted Subepithelial Keratectomy
Photorefractive Keratectomy
Laser In Situ Keratomileusis
Coma

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

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title = "Clinical Outcomes of an Optimized Prolate Ablation Procedure for Correcting Residual Refractive Errors Following Laser Surgery",
abstract = "PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to investigate the clinical efficacy of an optimized prolate ablation procedure for correcting residual refractive errors following laser surgery.METHODS: We analyzed 24 eyes of 15 patients who underwent an optimized prolate ablation procedure for the correction of residual refractive errors following laser in situ keratomileusis, laser-assisted subepithelial keratectomy, or photorefractive keratectomy surgeries. Preoperative ophthalmic examinations were performed, and uncorrected distance visual acuity, corrected distance visual acuity, manifest refraction values (sphere, cylinder, and spherical equivalent), point spread function, modulation transfer function, corneal asphericity (Q value), ocular aberrations, and corneal haze measurements were obtained postoperatively at 1, 3, and 6 months.RESULTS: Uncorrected distance visual acuity improved and refractive errors decreased significantly at 1, 3, and 6 months postoperatively. Total coma aberration increased at 3 and 6 months postoperatively, while changes in all other aberrations were not statistically significant. Similarly, no significant changes in point spread function were detected, but modulation transfer function increased significantly at the postoperative time points measured.CONCLUSIONS: The optimized prolate ablation procedure was effective in terms of improving visual acuity and objective visual performance for the correction of persistent refractive errors following laser surgery.",
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Clinical Outcomes of an Optimized Prolate Ablation Procedure for Correcting Residual Refractive Errors Following Laser Surgery. / Chung, Byunghoon; Lee, Hun; Choi, Bong Joon; Seo, KyoungYul; Kim, Eungkweon; Kim, Dae Yune; Kim, Tae-im.

In: Korean journal of ophthalmology : KJO, Vol. 31, No. 1, 01.02.2017, p. 16-24.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Kim, Eungkweon

AU - Kim, Dae Yune

AU - Kim, Tae-im

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