Cluster profiles of residentially incarcerated adolescent females: Violence and clinical mental health characteristics

Michael G. Vaughn, Christina E. Newhill, Christine M. Litschge, Matthew O. Howard

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We explored the presence of relatively discrete subgroups of adolescent females in a statewide sample (N = 94) using latent class statistical methodology. Specifically, we hypothesized that, rather than being a homogenous group, the girls in the sample would separate into clusters with both crossover and distinguishing characteristics. Results showed confirmation of our hypothesis with a best-fit three cluster solution consisting of a low violence cluster, a moderately violent cluster, and a high-rate violent cluster of girls. Findings provide a more precise identification and description of subgroups of female juvenile offenders to inform treatment efforts and provide a preliminary typology/cluster profile to build upon in future research addressing this population.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)35-53
Number of pages19
JournalResidential Treatment for Children and Youth
Volume24
Issue number1-2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2008 Sep 30

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Michael G. Vaughn, PhD, Christina E. Newhill, PhD, and Christine M. Litschge, MSW, are affiliated with School of Social Work, University of Pittsburgh. Matthew O. Howard, PhD, is affiliated with School of Social Work, University of North Carolina. Michael G. Vaughn, PhD, may be written at the School of Social Work, University of Pittsburgh, 2117 Cathedral of Learning, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (E-mail: mgv6@ pitt.edu). This work was supported by National Institute on Drug Abuse grants DA 15929 and DA 15556, Matthew O. Howard PI.

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Law

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