College expectations of eighth grade students: The role of learning approaches and parent influences

Kristen P. Kremer, Jin Huang, Michael George Vaughn, Brandy R. Maynard

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The development of expectations to attend college is the first step toward future college attendance, yet its predictors are not fully understood. The current study seeks to identify individual and parent predictors of expectations for college completion among eighth grade students and examine inter-relationships between the independent variables. Data were used from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Kindergarten Cohort (ECLS-K), a nationally representative and longitudinal study of 21,260 kindergarteners. Logistic regression models were employed to predict college expectations of eighth grade students from child and parent characteristics. Youth were more likely to expect to complete college when they had greater learning approaches (OR = 1.82, 95% CI = 1.05–3.15) and higher school competence/liking (OR = 1.60, 95% CI = 1.13–2.26). Controlling for demographic covariates, the odds of students expecting to complete college were nearly four times greater for youth whose parents expected them to complete a bachelor's degree (OR = 3.82, 95% CI = 2.34–6.23), compared to parents who expected their children to complete high school or less. A generalized structural equation model was then specified to understand the inter-relationships between child's behavior, learning approaches, and reading and math abilities. Child's self-control (β = 0.57, 95% CI = 0.53–0.60) and internalizing behavior (β = −0.15, 95% CI = -0.19 - -0.12) significantly predicted learning approaches, which then predicted child's reading ability (β = 0.24, 95% CI = 0.20–0.28) and math ability (β = 0.26, 95% CI = 0.00–0.53). Future research should examine effectiveness of programs seeking to increase student learning abilities and feelings of competence.

Original languageEnglish
Article number104396
JournalChildren and Youth Services Review
Volume104
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019 Sep 1

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Aptitude
parents
school grade
Learning
Students
Mental Competency
learning
Longitudinal Studies
Reading
student
Parents
Logistic Models
ability
Structural Models
longitudinal study
Program Evaluation
Child Behavior
Emotions
learning behavior
self-control

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

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title = "College expectations of eighth grade students: The role of learning approaches and parent influences",
abstract = "The development of expectations to attend college is the first step toward future college attendance, yet its predictors are not fully understood. The current study seeks to identify individual and parent predictors of expectations for college completion among eighth grade students and examine inter-relationships between the independent variables. Data were used from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Kindergarten Cohort (ECLS-K), a nationally representative and longitudinal study of 21,260 kindergarteners. Logistic regression models were employed to predict college expectations of eighth grade students from child and parent characteristics. Youth were more likely to expect to complete college when they had greater learning approaches (OR = 1.82, 95{\%} CI = 1.05–3.15) and higher school competence/liking (OR = 1.60, 95{\%} CI = 1.13–2.26). Controlling for demographic covariates, the odds of students expecting to complete college were nearly four times greater for youth whose parents expected them to complete a bachelor's degree (OR = 3.82, 95{\%} CI = 2.34–6.23), compared to parents who expected their children to complete high school or less. A generalized structural equation model was then specified to understand the inter-relationships between child's behavior, learning approaches, and reading and math abilities. Child's self-control (β = 0.57, 95{\%} CI = 0.53–0.60) and internalizing behavior (β = −0.15, 95{\%} CI = -0.19 - -0.12) significantly predicted learning approaches, which then predicted child's reading ability (β = 0.24, 95{\%} CI = 0.20–0.28) and math ability (β = 0.26, 95{\%} CI = 0.00–0.53). Future research should examine effectiveness of programs seeking to increase student learning abilities and feelings of competence.",
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College expectations of eighth grade students : The role of learning approaches and parent influences. / Kremer, Kristen P.; Huang, Jin; Vaughn, Michael George; Maynard, Brandy R.

In: Children and Youth Services Review, Vol. 104, 104396, 01.09.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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