Combined effect of body mass index and body size perception on metabolic syndrome in South Korea: Results of the fifth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (2010-2012) Disease epidemiology - Chronic

Sook Hee Yoon, Kyu Tae Han, Sun Jung Kim, Tae Yong Sohn, Byungyool Jeon, Woorim Kim, Eun Cheol Park

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Body mass index (BMI) has been used as an indirect predictor for the risk of metabolic syndrome. However, there are challenges in evaluating the risk of metabolic syndrome using BMI in certain parts of the world. Therefore, it is worth exploring additional factors that could supplement BMI to predict the risk of metabolic syndrome. In this study, we assessed the combined effect of BMI and perception for predicting metabolic syndrome. Methods: We used the fifth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (KNHANES V, 2010-12, N∈=∈16,537) in this study. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was performed to examine the association while controlling for potential confounding variables. We also performed an analysis for the combined effect of BMI and perception of body size, and subgroup analysis by age group or moderate physical activity. Results: Data from 16,537 participants were analyzed in this study (males: 6,978, females: 9,559). Among them, metabolic syndrome was diagnosed in 1,252 (17.9 %) males and 2,445 (25.6 %) females, respectively. The combination of BMI and body size perception had a positive relation with the presence of metabolic syndrome. People who perceived themselves to be overweight for their body size had a higher risk for metabolic syndrome even if they have the same BMI. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that the combination of body size perception and BMI is useful in predicting the risk of metabolic syndrome. The use of complementary predictors could reduce the risk for inaccurate prediction of metabolic syndrome.

Original languageEnglish
Article number554
JournalBMC Public Health
Volume15
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015 Jun 17

Fingerprint

Size Perception
Republic of Korea
Nutrition Surveys
Body Size
Korea
Epidemiology
Body Mass Index
Chronic Disease
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Age Groups
Logistic Models
Regression Analysis

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

@article{2e20b4dea1cb4efdbd0e5eaf4a421ffc,
title = "Combined effect of body mass index and body size perception on metabolic syndrome in South Korea: Results of the fifth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (2010-2012) Disease epidemiology - Chronic",
abstract = "Background: Body mass index (BMI) has been used as an indirect predictor for the risk of metabolic syndrome. However, there are challenges in evaluating the risk of metabolic syndrome using BMI in certain parts of the world. Therefore, it is worth exploring additional factors that could supplement BMI to predict the risk of metabolic syndrome. In this study, we assessed the combined effect of BMI and perception for predicting metabolic syndrome. Methods: We used the fifth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (KNHANES V, 2010-12, N∈=∈16,537) in this study. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was performed to examine the association while controlling for potential confounding variables. We also performed an analysis for the combined effect of BMI and perception of body size, and subgroup analysis by age group or moderate physical activity. Results: Data from 16,537 participants were analyzed in this study (males: 6,978, females: 9,559). Among them, metabolic syndrome was diagnosed in 1,252 (17.9 {\%}) males and 2,445 (25.6 {\%}) females, respectively. The combination of BMI and body size perception had a positive relation with the presence of metabolic syndrome. People who perceived themselves to be overweight for their body size had a higher risk for metabolic syndrome even if they have the same BMI. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that the combination of body size perception and BMI is useful in predicting the risk of metabolic syndrome. The use of complementary predictors could reduce the risk for inaccurate prediction of metabolic syndrome.",
author = "Yoon, {Sook Hee} and Han, {Kyu Tae} and Kim, {Sun Jung} and Sohn, {Tae Yong} and Byungyool Jeon and Woorim Kim and Park, {Eun Cheol}",
year = "2015",
month = "6",
day = "17",
doi = "10.1186/s12889-015-1839-6",
language = "English",
volume = "15",
journal = "BMC Public Health",
issn = "1471-2458",
publisher = "BioMed Central",
number = "1",

}

Combined effect of body mass index and body size perception on metabolic syndrome in South Korea : Results of the fifth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (2010-2012) Disease epidemiology - Chronic. / Yoon, Sook Hee; Han, Kyu Tae; Kim, Sun Jung; Sohn, Tae Yong; Jeon, Byungyool; Kim, Woorim; Park, Eun Cheol.

In: BMC Public Health, Vol. 15, No. 1, 554, 17.06.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

TY - JOUR

T1 - Combined effect of body mass index and body size perception on metabolic syndrome in South Korea

T2 - Results of the fifth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (2010-2012) Disease epidemiology - Chronic

AU - Yoon, Sook Hee

AU - Han, Kyu Tae

AU - Kim, Sun Jung

AU - Sohn, Tae Yong

AU - Jeon, Byungyool

AU - Kim, Woorim

AU - Park, Eun Cheol

PY - 2015/6/17

Y1 - 2015/6/17

N2 - Background: Body mass index (BMI) has been used as an indirect predictor for the risk of metabolic syndrome. However, there are challenges in evaluating the risk of metabolic syndrome using BMI in certain parts of the world. Therefore, it is worth exploring additional factors that could supplement BMI to predict the risk of metabolic syndrome. In this study, we assessed the combined effect of BMI and perception for predicting metabolic syndrome. Methods: We used the fifth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (KNHANES V, 2010-12, N∈=∈16,537) in this study. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was performed to examine the association while controlling for potential confounding variables. We also performed an analysis for the combined effect of BMI and perception of body size, and subgroup analysis by age group or moderate physical activity. Results: Data from 16,537 participants were analyzed in this study (males: 6,978, females: 9,559). Among them, metabolic syndrome was diagnosed in 1,252 (17.9 %) males and 2,445 (25.6 %) females, respectively. The combination of BMI and body size perception had a positive relation with the presence of metabolic syndrome. People who perceived themselves to be overweight for their body size had a higher risk for metabolic syndrome even if they have the same BMI. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that the combination of body size perception and BMI is useful in predicting the risk of metabolic syndrome. The use of complementary predictors could reduce the risk for inaccurate prediction of metabolic syndrome.

AB - Background: Body mass index (BMI) has been used as an indirect predictor for the risk of metabolic syndrome. However, there are challenges in evaluating the risk of metabolic syndrome using BMI in certain parts of the world. Therefore, it is worth exploring additional factors that could supplement BMI to predict the risk of metabolic syndrome. In this study, we assessed the combined effect of BMI and perception for predicting metabolic syndrome. Methods: We used the fifth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (KNHANES V, 2010-12, N∈=∈16,537) in this study. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was performed to examine the association while controlling for potential confounding variables. We also performed an analysis for the combined effect of BMI and perception of body size, and subgroup analysis by age group or moderate physical activity. Results: Data from 16,537 participants were analyzed in this study (males: 6,978, females: 9,559). Among them, metabolic syndrome was diagnosed in 1,252 (17.9 %) males and 2,445 (25.6 %) females, respectively. The combination of BMI and body size perception had a positive relation with the presence of metabolic syndrome. People who perceived themselves to be overweight for their body size had a higher risk for metabolic syndrome even if they have the same BMI. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that the combination of body size perception and BMI is useful in predicting the risk of metabolic syndrome. The use of complementary predictors could reduce the risk for inaccurate prediction of metabolic syndrome.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84935862131&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84935862131&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1186/s12889-015-1839-6

DO - 10.1186/s12889-015-1839-6

M3 - Review article

C2 - 26081846

AN - SCOPUS:84935862131

VL - 15

JO - BMC Public Health

JF - BMC Public Health

SN - 1471-2458

IS - 1

M1 - 554

ER -