Combined effects of education level and perceived social class on self-rated health and life satisfaction

Results of Korean labor and income panel study wave 8-wave 15

Jae Hyun Kim, Ki Bong Yoo, Euncheol Park, Sang Gyu Lee, Tae Hyun Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: To examine the combined effects of education level and perceived social class on self-rated health and life satisfaction in South Korea. Methods: We used data drawn from the 8 to 15th wave of the Korean Labor and Income Panel Study (KLIPS). Using wave 8 at baseline, data included 11,175 individuals. We performed a longitudinal analysis at baseline estimating the prevalence of self-rated health and life satisfaction among individuals by education level (high, middle, and low education level) and perceived social class (high, middle, and low social class). Results: For self-rated health, odds ratio (OR) of individuals with low education and low perceived social class was 0.604 times lower (95 % CI: 0.555-0.656) and the OR of individuals with low education and middle perceived social class was 0.853 time lower (95 % CI: 0.790-0.922) when compared to individuals with high education and high perceived social class. For life satisfaction, OR of individuals with low education and low perceived social class was 0.068 times lower (95 % CI: 0.063-0.074) and the OR of individuals with middle education and middle perceived social class was 0.235 time lower (95 % CI: 0.221-0.251) compared to individuals with high education and high perceived social class. Conclusions: This study shows that the combined effects of education level and perceived social class associated with self-rated health and life satisfaction. Our study suggests increasing education level and perceived social class. Additionally, it will be important to develop multi-dimensional measurement tools including education level and subjective social class.

Original languageEnglish
Article number178
JournalHealth and Quality of Life Outcomes
Volume13
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015 Nov 2

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Social Class
Education
Health
Odds Ratio
Republic of Korea

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

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title = "Combined effects of education level and perceived social class on self-rated health and life satisfaction: Results of Korean labor and income panel study wave 8-wave 15",
abstract = "Background: To examine the combined effects of education level and perceived social class on self-rated health and life satisfaction in South Korea. Methods: We used data drawn from the 8 to 15th wave of the Korean Labor and Income Panel Study (KLIPS). Using wave 8 at baseline, data included 11,175 individuals. We performed a longitudinal analysis at baseline estimating the prevalence of self-rated health and life satisfaction among individuals by education level (high, middle, and low education level) and perceived social class (high, middle, and low social class). Results: For self-rated health, odds ratio (OR) of individuals with low education and low perceived social class was 0.604 times lower (95 {\%} CI: 0.555-0.656) and the OR of individuals with low education and middle perceived social class was 0.853 time lower (95 {\%} CI: 0.790-0.922) when compared to individuals with high education and high perceived social class. For life satisfaction, OR of individuals with low education and low perceived social class was 0.068 times lower (95 {\%} CI: 0.063-0.074) and the OR of individuals with middle education and middle perceived social class was 0.235 time lower (95 {\%} CI: 0.221-0.251) compared to individuals with high education and high perceived social class. Conclusions: This study shows that the combined effects of education level and perceived social class associated with self-rated health and life satisfaction. Our study suggests increasing education level and perceived social class. Additionally, it will be important to develop multi-dimensional measurement tools including education level and subjective social class.",
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Combined effects of education level and perceived social class on self-rated health and life satisfaction : Results of Korean labor and income panel study wave 8-wave 15. / Kim, Jae Hyun; Yoo, Ki Bong; Park, Euncheol; Lee, Sang Gyu; Kim, Tae Hyun.

In: Health and Quality of Life Outcomes, Vol. 13, No. 1, 178, 02.11.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Combined effects of education level and perceived social class on self-rated health and life satisfaction

T2 - Results of Korean labor and income panel study wave 8-wave 15

AU - Kim, Jae Hyun

AU - Yoo, Ki Bong

AU - Park, Euncheol

AU - Lee, Sang Gyu

AU - Kim, Tae Hyun

PY - 2015/11/2

Y1 - 2015/11/2

N2 - Background: To examine the combined effects of education level and perceived social class on self-rated health and life satisfaction in South Korea. Methods: We used data drawn from the 8 to 15th wave of the Korean Labor and Income Panel Study (KLIPS). Using wave 8 at baseline, data included 11,175 individuals. We performed a longitudinal analysis at baseline estimating the prevalence of self-rated health and life satisfaction among individuals by education level (high, middle, and low education level) and perceived social class (high, middle, and low social class). Results: For self-rated health, odds ratio (OR) of individuals with low education and low perceived social class was 0.604 times lower (95 % CI: 0.555-0.656) and the OR of individuals with low education and middle perceived social class was 0.853 time lower (95 % CI: 0.790-0.922) when compared to individuals with high education and high perceived social class. For life satisfaction, OR of individuals with low education and low perceived social class was 0.068 times lower (95 % CI: 0.063-0.074) and the OR of individuals with middle education and middle perceived social class was 0.235 time lower (95 % CI: 0.221-0.251) compared to individuals with high education and high perceived social class. Conclusions: This study shows that the combined effects of education level and perceived social class associated with self-rated health and life satisfaction. Our study suggests increasing education level and perceived social class. Additionally, it will be important to develop multi-dimensional measurement tools including education level and subjective social class.

AB - Background: To examine the combined effects of education level and perceived social class on self-rated health and life satisfaction in South Korea. Methods: We used data drawn from the 8 to 15th wave of the Korean Labor and Income Panel Study (KLIPS). Using wave 8 at baseline, data included 11,175 individuals. We performed a longitudinal analysis at baseline estimating the prevalence of self-rated health and life satisfaction among individuals by education level (high, middle, and low education level) and perceived social class (high, middle, and low social class). Results: For self-rated health, odds ratio (OR) of individuals with low education and low perceived social class was 0.604 times lower (95 % CI: 0.555-0.656) and the OR of individuals with low education and middle perceived social class was 0.853 time lower (95 % CI: 0.790-0.922) when compared to individuals with high education and high perceived social class. For life satisfaction, OR of individuals with low education and low perceived social class was 0.068 times lower (95 % CI: 0.063-0.074) and the OR of individuals with middle education and middle perceived social class was 0.235 time lower (95 % CI: 0.221-0.251) compared to individuals with high education and high perceived social class. Conclusions: This study shows that the combined effects of education level and perceived social class associated with self-rated health and life satisfaction. Our study suggests increasing education level and perceived social class. Additionally, it will be important to develop multi-dimensional measurement tools including education level and subjective social class.

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DO - 10.1186/s12955-015-0375-5

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JO - Health and Quality of Life Outcomes

JF - Health and Quality of Life Outcomes

SN - 1477-7525

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