Comparative analysis of serial and parallel laser patterning of Ag nanowire thin films

Harim Oh, Myeongkyu Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Ag nanowire (AgNW) films solution-coated on a glass substrate were laser-patterned in two different ways. For the conventional serial process, a pulsed ultraviolet laser of 30 kHz repetition rate and ∼20 ns pulse width was employed as the laser source. For parallel patterning, the film was directly irradiated by a spatially-modulated Nd:YAG laser beam that has a low repetition rate of 10 kHz and a shorter pulse width of 5 ns. While multiple pulses with energy density ranging from 3 to 9 J/cm 2 were required to pattern the film in the serial process, a single pulse with energy density of 0.16 J/cm 2 completely removed AgNWs in the parallel patterning. This may be explained by the difference in patterning mechanism. In the parallel process using short pulses of 5 ns width, AgNWs can be removed in their solid state by the laser-induced thermo-elastic force, while they should be evaporated in the serial process utilizing a high-repetition rate laser. Important process parameters such as threshold energy density, speed, and available feature sizes are comparatively discussed for the two patterning

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)617-623
Number of pages7
JournalApplied Surface Science
Volume399
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017 Mar 31

Fingerprint

Nanowires
nanowires
Thin films
repetition
flux density
Lasers
thin films
lasers
pulse duration
pulses
Ultraviolet lasers
ultraviolet lasers
Pulsed lasers
Laser beams
YAG lasers
Laser pulses
pulsed lasers
laser beams
solid state
Glass

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surfaces, Coatings and Films

Cite this

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Comparative analysis of serial and parallel laser patterning of Ag nanowire thin films. / Oh, Harim; Lee, Myeongkyu.

In: Applied Surface Science, Vol. 399, 31.03.2017, p. 617-623.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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