Comparative study of resection and radiofrequency ablation in the treatment of solitary colorectal liver metastases

Hyuk Hur, Yong Taek Ko, Byung Soh Min, Kyung Sik Kim, Jin Sub Choi, Seung Kook Sohn, Chang Hwan Cho, Heung Kyu Ko, Jong Tai Lee, Namkyu Kim

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Abstract

Background: We compared outcomes in patients with solitary colorectal liver metastases treated by either hepatic resection (HR) or radiofrequency ablation (RFA). Methods: A retrospective analysis from a prospective database was performed on 67 consecutive patients with solitary colorectal liver metastases treated by either HR or RFA. Results: Forty-two patients underwent HR and 25 patients underwent RFA. The 5-year overall and local recurrence-free survival rates after HR (50.1% and 89.7%, respectively) were higher than after RFA (25.5% and 69.7%, respectively) (P = .0263 and .028, respectively). In small tumors less than 3 cm (n = 38), the 5-year survival rates between HR and RFA were similar, including overall (56.1% vs 55.4%, P = .451) and local recurrence-free (95.7% vs 85.6%, P = .304) survival rates. On multivariate analysis, tumor size, metastases treatment, and primary node status were significant prognostic factors. Conclusions: HR had better outcomes than RFA for recurrence and survival after treatment of solitary colorectal liver metastases. However, in tumors smaller than 3 cm, RFA can be recommended as an alternative treatment to patients who are not candidates for surgery because the liver metastases is poorly located anatomically, the functional hepatic reserve after a resection would be insufficient, the patient's comorbidity inhibits a major surgery, or extrahepatic metastases are present.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)728-736
Number of pages9
JournalAmerican Journal of Surgery
Volume197
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009 Jun 1

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Neoplasm Metastasis
Liver
Therapeutics
Survival Rate
Recurrence
Neoplasms
Comorbidity
Multivariate Analysis
Databases
Survival

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery

Cite this

Hur, Hyuk ; Ko, Yong Taek ; Min, Byung Soh ; Kim, Kyung Sik ; Choi, Jin Sub ; Sohn, Seung Kook ; Cho, Chang Hwan ; Ko, Heung Kyu ; Lee, Jong Tai ; Kim, Namkyu. / Comparative study of resection and radiofrequency ablation in the treatment of solitary colorectal liver metastases. In: American Journal of Surgery. 2009 ; Vol. 197, No. 6. pp. 728-736.
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abstract = "Background: We compared outcomes in patients with solitary colorectal liver metastases treated by either hepatic resection (HR) or radiofrequency ablation (RFA). Methods: A retrospective analysis from a prospective database was performed on 67 consecutive patients with solitary colorectal liver metastases treated by either HR or RFA. Results: Forty-two patients underwent HR and 25 patients underwent RFA. The 5-year overall and local recurrence-free survival rates after HR (50.1{\%} and 89.7{\%}, respectively) were higher than after RFA (25.5{\%} and 69.7{\%}, respectively) (P = .0263 and .028, respectively). In small tumors less than 3 cm (n = 38), the 5-year survival rates between HR and RFA were similar, including overall (56.1{\%} vs 55.4{\%}, P = .451) and local recurrence-free (95.7{\%} vs 85.6{\%}, P = .304) survival rates. On multivariate analysis, tumor size, metastases treatment, and primary node status were significant prognostic factors. Conclusions: HR had better outcomes than RFA for recurrence and survival after treatment of solitary colorectal liver metastases. However, in tumors smaller than 3 cm, RFA can be recommended as an alternative treatment to patients who are not candidates for surgery because the liver metastases is poorly located anatomically, the functional hepatic reserve after a resection would be insufficient, the patient's comorbidity inhibits a major surgery, or extrahepatic metastases are present.",
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Comparative study of resection and radiofrequency ablation in the treatment of solitary colorectal liver metastases. / Hur, Hyuk; Ko, Yong Taek; Min, Byung Soh; Kim, Kyung Sik; Choi, Jin Sub; Sohn, Seung Kook; Cho, Chang Hwan; Ko, Heung Kyu; Lee, Jong Tai; Kim, Namkyu.

In: American Journal of Surgery, Vol. 197, No. 6, 01.06.2009, p. 728-736.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - Comparative study of resection and radiofrequency ablation in the treatment of solitary colorectal liver metastases

AU - Hur, Hyuk

AU - Ko, Yong Taek

AU - Min, Byung Soh

AU - Kim, Kyung Sik

AU - Choi, Jin Sub

AU - Sohn, Seung Kook

AU - Cho, Chang Hwan

AU - Ko, Heung Kyu

AU - Lee, Jong Tai

AU - Kim, Namkyu

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N2 - Background: We compared outcomes in patients with solitary colorectal liver metastases treated by either hepatic resection (HR) or radiofrequency ablation (RFA). Methods: A retrospective analysis from a prospective database was performed on 67 consecutive patients with solitary colorectal liver metastases treated by either HR or RFA. Results: Forty-two patients underwent HR and 25 patients underwent RFA. The 5-year overall and local recurrence-free survival rates after HR (50.1% and 89.7%, respectively) were higher than after RFA (25.5% and 69.7%, respectively) (P = .0263 and .028, respectively). In small tumors less than 3 cm (n = 38), the 5-year survival rates between HR and RFA were similar, including overall (56.1% vs 55.4%, P = .451) and local recurrence-free (95.7% vs 85.6%, P = .304) survival rates. On multivariate analysis, tumor size, metastases treatment, and primary node status were significant prognostic factors. Conclusions: HR had better outcomes than RFA for recurrence and survival after treatment of solitary colorectal liver metastases. However, in tumors smaller than 3 cm, RFA can be recommended as an alternative treatment to patients who are not candidates for surgery because the liver metastases is poorly located anatomically, the functional hepatic reserve after a resection would be insufficient, the patient's comorbidity inhibits a major surgery, or extrahepatic metastases are present.

AB - Background: We compared outcomes in patients with solitary colorectal liver metastases treated by either hepatic resection (HR) or radiofrequency ablation (RFA). Methods: A retrospective analysis from a prospective database was performed on 67 consecutive patients with solitary colorectal liver metastases treated by either HR or RFA. Results: Forty-two patients underwent HR and 25 patients underwent RFA. The 5-year overall and local recurrence-free survival rates after HR (50.1% and 89.7%, respectively) were higher than after RFA (25.5% and 69.7%, respectively) (P = .0263 and .028, respectively). In small tumors less than 3 cm (n = 38), the 5-year survival rates between HR and RFA were similar, including overall (56.1% vs 55.4%, P = .451) and local recurrence-free (95.7% vs 85.6%, P = .304) survival rates. On multivariate analysis, tumor size, metastases treatment, and primary node status were significant prognostic factors. Conclusions: HR had better outcomes than RFA for recurrence and survival after treatment of solitary colorectal liver metastases. However, in tumors smaller than 3 cm, RFA can be recommended as an alternative treatment to patients who are not candidates for surgery because the liver metastases is poorly located anatomically, the functional hepatic reserve after a resection would be insufficient, the patient's comorbidity inhibits a major surgery, or extrahepatic metastases are present.

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