Comparison of analgesic effect of preoperative topical diclofenac and ketorolac on postoperative pain after photorefractive keratectomy

Jin Pyo Hong, Sang Min Nam, Chan Young Im, Sangchul Yoon, Tae-im Kim, Eungkweon Kim, KyoungYul Seo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Results: The natural peak of pain was located between 24 and 36 hours. Initially, the degree of pain reduction was constant for both NSAIDs; it dropped after 24 hours and 36 hours in the ketorolac group and the diclofenac group, respectively. The postoperative time-serial pattern of the pain score changed in the diclofenac group but not in the ketorolac group compared with the pattern in the ofloxacin-treated eye. The visual outcome was not affected by either NSAID, and significant complications were not noticed for a mean of 7 months.

Methods: Ninety-four patients were randomly assigned to 2 groups: ketorolac group (ketorolac 0.5% in 1 eye and ofloxacin 0.3% in the other eye) and diclofenac group (diclofenac 0.1% in 1 eye and ofloxacin 0.3% in the other eye). One drop of each ophthalmic drug was applied 3 times to each eye 30 minutes before PRK. No other NSAID or steroid was prescribed until 4 days after PRK. The patients were asked to score the postoperative pain in each eye with a visual analog scale at 6, 18, 24, 36, 48, 72, and 96 hours.

Conclusions: The duration and pattern of the action may vary according to types of NSAIDs. Preemptive topical diclofenac 0.1% was a safe and effective method for post-PRK pain control.

Financial Disclosure: No author has a financial or proprietary interest in any material or method mentioned.

Purpose: To investigate changes in the pain-suppressing potency of 2 preoperatively applied topical nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) after photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) using a time-serial pain-scoring system.

Design: Comparative case series.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1689-1696
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Cataract and Refractive Surgery
Volume40
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014 Jan 1

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Ketorolac
Photorefractive Keratectomy
Diclofenac
Postoperative Pain
Analgesics
Anti-Inflammatory Agents
Pain
Ofloxacin
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Disclosure
Visual Analog Scale
Steroids

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery
  • Ophthalmology
  • Sensory Systems

Cite this

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title = "Comparison of analgesic effect of preoperative topical diclofenac and ketorolac on postoperative pain after photorefractive keratectomy",
abstract = "Results: The natural peak of pain was located between 24 and 36 hours. Initially, the degree of pain reduction was constant for both NSAIDs; it dropped after 24 hours and 36 hours in the ketorolac group and the diclofenac group, respectively. The postoperative time-serial pattern of the pain score changed in the diclofenac group but not in the ketorolac group compared with the pattern in the ofloxacin-treated eye. The visual outcome was not affected by either NSAID, and significant complications were not noticed for a mean of 7 months.Methods: Ninety-four patients were randomly assigned to 2 groups: ketorolac group (ketorolac 0.5{\%} in 1 eye and ofloxacin 0.3{\%} in the other eye) and diclofenac group (diclofenac 0.1{\%} in 1 eye and ofloxacin 0.3{\%} in the other eye). One drop of each ophthalmic drug was applied 3 times to each eye 30 minutes before PRK. No other NSAID or steroid was prescribed until 4 days after PRK. The patients were asked to score the postoperative pain in each eye with a visual analog scale at 6, 18, 24, 36, 48, 72, and 96 hours.Conclusions: The duration and pattern of the action may vary according to types of NSAIDs. Preemptive topical diclofenac 0.1{\%} was a safe and effective method for post-PRK pain control.Financial Disclosure: No author has a financial or proprietary interest in any material or method mentioned.Purpose: To investigate changes in the pain-suppressing potency of 2 preoperatively applied topical nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) after photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) using a time-serial pain-scoring system.Design: Comparative case series.",
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Comparison of analgesic effect of preoperative topical diclofenac and ketorolac on postoperative pain after photorefractive keratectomy. / Hong, Jin Pyo; Nam, Sang Min; Im, Chan Young; Yoon, Sangchul; Kim, Tae-im; Kim, Eungkweon; Seo, KyoungYul.

In: Journal of Cataract and Refractive Surgery, Vol. 40, No. 10, 01.01.2014, p. 1689-1696.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Comparison of analgesic effect of preoperative topical diclofenac and ketorolac on postoperative pain after photorefractive keratectomy

AU - Hong, Jin Pyo

AU - Nam, Sang Min

AU - Im, Chan Young

AU - Yoon, Sangchul

AU - Kim, Tae-im

AU - Kim, Eungkweon

AU - Seo, KyoungYul

PY - 2014/1/1

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N2 - Results: The natural peak of pain was located between 24 and 36 hours. Initially, the degree of pain reduction was constant for both NSAIDs; it dropped after 24 hours and 36 hours in the ketorolac group and the diclofenac group, respectively. The postoperative time-serial pattern of the pain score changed in the diclofenac group but not in the ketorolac group compared with the pattern in the ofloxacin-treated eye. The visual outcome was not affected by either NSAID, and significant complications were not noticed for a mean of 7 months.Methods: Ninety-four patients were randomly assigned to 2 groups: ketorolac group (ketorolac 0.5% in 1 eye and ofloxacin 0.3% in the other eye) and diclofenac group (diclofenac 0.1% in 1 eye and ofloxacin 0.3% in the other eye). One drop of each ophthalmic drug was applied 3 times to each eye 30 minutes before PRK. No other NSAID or steroid was prescribed until 4 days after PRK. The patients were asked to score the postoperative pain in each eye with a visual analog scale at 6, 18, 24, 36, 48, 72, and 96 hours.Conclusions: The duration and pattern of the action may vary according to types of NSAIDs. Preemptive topical diclofenac 0.1% was a safe and effective method for post-PRK pain control.Financial Disclosure: No author has a financial or proprietary interest in any material or method mentioned.Purpose: To investigate changes in the pain-suppressing potency of 2 preoperatively applied topical nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) after photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) using a time-serial pain-scoring system.Design: Comparative case series.

AB - Results: The natural peak of pain was located between 24 and 36 hours. Initially, the degree of pain reduction was constant for both NSAIDs; it dropped after 24 hours and 36 hours in the ketorolac group and the diclofenac group, respectively. The postoperative time-serial pattern of the pain score changed in the diclofenac group but not in the ketorolac group compared with the pattern in the ofloxacin-treated eye. The visual outcome was not affected by either NSAID, and significant complications were not noticed for a mean of 7 months.Methods: Ninety-four patients were randomly assigned to 2 groups: ketorolac group (ketorolac 0.5% in 1 eye and ofloxacin 0.3% in the other eye) and diclofenac group (diclofenac 0.1% in 1 eye and ofloxacin 0.3% in the other eye). One drop of each ophthalmic drug was applied 3 times to each eye 30 minutes before PRK. No other NSAID or steroid was prescribed until 4 days after PRK. The patients were asked to score the postoperative pain in each eye with a visual analog scale at 6, 18, 24, 36, 48, 72, and 96 hours.Conclusions: The duration and pattern of the action may vary according to types of NSAIDs. Preemptive topical diclofenac 0.1% was a safe and effective method for post-PRK pain control.Financial Disclosure: No author has a financial or proprietary interest in any material or method mentioned.Purpose: To investigate changes in the pain-suppressing potency of 2 preoperatively applied topical nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) after photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) using a time-serial pain-scoring system.Design: Comparative case series.

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