Comparison of body fat composition and serum adiponectin levels in diabetic obesity and non-diabetic obesity

Chulsik Kim, Jina Park, Jongsuk Park, Eunseok Kang, Chulwoo Ahn, Bongsoo Cha, Sungkil Lim, Kyungrae Kim, Hyunchul Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

28 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Clinical aspects of diabetes and obesity are somewhat different, even at similar levels of insulin resistance. The purpose of this study was to determine differences in body fat distribution and serum adiponectin concentrations in diabetic and non-diabetic obese participants. We were also interested in identifying the characteristics of insulin resistance in these two groups, particularly from the standpoint of adiponectin. Research Methods and Procedures: Adiponectin concentrations of 112 type 2 diabetic obese participants and 124 non-diabetic obese participants were determined. Abdominal adipose tissue areas and midthigh skeletal muscle areas were measured by computed tomography. A homeostasis model assessment of the insulin resistance score was calculated to assess insulin sensitivity. The relationships among serum adiponectin, body fat distribution, and clinical characteristics were also analyzed. Results: Both abdominal subcutaneous and visceral fat areas were higher in the non-diabetic obese group, whereas midthigh low-density muscle area was higher in the diabetic obese group. The homeostasis model assessment of the insulin resistance score was similar between groups, whereas serum adiponectin was lower in the diabetic obese group. Abdominal visceral fat (β = -0.381, p = 0.012) was a more important predictor of adiponectin concentration than low-density muscle (β = -0.218, p = 0.026) in cases of non-diabetic obesity, whereas low-density muscle (β = -0.413, p = 0.013) was a better predictor of adiponectin level than abdominal visceral fat (β = - 0.228, p = 0.044) in diabetic obese patients. Discussion: Therefore, factors involved in pathophysiology, including different serum adiponectin levels and body fat distributions, are believed to be responsible for differences in clinical characteristics, even at similar levels of insulin resistance in both diseases.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1164-1171
Number of pages8
JournalObesity
Volume14
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2006 Jul 1

Fingerprint

Adiponectin
Body Composition
Adipose Tissue
Obesity
Insulin Resistance
Serum
Body Fat Distribution
Intra-Abdominal Fat
Muscles
Homeostasis
Abdominal Subcutaneous Fat
Abdominal Fat
Skeletal Muscle
Tomography
Research

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Endocrinology
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

Kim, Chulsik ; Park, Jina ; Park, Jongsuk ; Kang, Eunseok ; Ahn, Chulwoo ; Cha, Bongsoo ; Lim, Sungkil ; Kim, Kyungrae ; Lee, Hyunchul. / Comparison of body fat composition and serum adiponectin levels in diabetic obesity and non-diabetic obesity. In: Obesity. 2006 ; Vol. 14, No. 7. pp. 1164-1171.
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Kim, C, Park, J, Park, J, Kang, E, Ahn, C, Cha, B, Lim, S, Kim, K & Lee, H 2006, 'Comparison of body fat composition and serum adiponectin levels in diabetic obesity and non-diabetic obesity', Obesity, vol. 14, no. 7, pp. 1164-1171. https://doi.org/10.1038/oby.2006.133

Comparison of body fat composition and serum adiponectin levels in diabetic obesity and non-diabetic obesity. / Kim, Chulsik; Park, Jina; Park, Jongsuk; Kang, Eunseok; Ahn, Chulwoo; Cha, Bongsoo; Lim, Sungkil; Kim, Kyungrae; Lee, Hyunchul.

In: Obesity, Vol. 14, No. 7, 01.07.2006, p. 1164-1171.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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