Comparison of corpus callosotomy and vagus nerve stimulation in children with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome

Su Jeong You, Hoon Chul Kang, Tae Sung Ko, Heung Dong Kim, Mi Sun Yum, Yong Soon Hwang, Jung Kyo Lee, Dong Suk Kim, Sang Keun Park

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

62 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: To compare the efficacy of corpus callosotomy and vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) for long-term adjunctive therapy in children with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome (LGS). Method: Fourteen patients underwent a total corpus callosotomy and 10 patients received VNS implantation. The patients were monitored for more than 12 months after treatment, and seizure rates and complications were retrospectively evaluated. Results: Seizure types among the 24 patients included atonic or tonic seizures with head-drops in 17 patients, generalized tonic seizures in two patients, atypical absence seizures in one patient, generalized tonic-clonic seizures in one patient, and myoclonic seizures in three patients. Of the 14 patients who underwent a corpus callosotomy, nine (64.3%) had a greater than 50% reduction in seizure frequency and five (35.7%) had a greater than 75% reduction. Of the 10 patients who underwent VNS implantation, seven (70.0%) had a greater than 50% reduction in seizure frequency and two (20.0%) had a greater than 75% reduction. There was no significant difference between the two procedures in terms of final efficacy. Complications of corpus callosotomy included aphasia in one patient, ataxia in another, and paresis in a third. Among patients receiving VNS, one patient experienced dyspnea while sleeping and one patient suffered from drooling. These complications were transient and tolerable, and were controlled by simple adjustments of VNS treatment parameters. Conclusion: The efficacy and safety of corpus callosotomy and VNS were comparable in children with LGS.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)195-199
Number of pages5
JournalBrain and Development
Volume30
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2008 Mar 1

Fingerprint

Vagus Nerve Stimulation
Seizures
Lennox Gastaut Syndrome
Sialorrhea
Absence Epilepsy
Aphasia
Paresis
Ataxia

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Developmental Neuroscience
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

You, Su Jeong ; Kang, Hoon Chul ; Ko, Tae Sung ; Kim, Heung Dong ; Yum, Mi Sun ; Hwang, Yong Soon ; Lee, Jung Kyo ; Kim, Dong Suk ; Park, Sang Keun. / Comparison of corpus callosotomy and vagus nerve stimulation in children with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome. In: Brain and Development. 2008 ; Vol. 30, No. 3. pp. 195-199.
@article{4779977583be47bd9c14c1141fa17961,
title = "Comparison of corpus callosotomy and vagus nerve stimulation in children with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome",
abstract = "Purpose: To compare the efficacy of corpus callosotomy and vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) for long-term adjunctive therapy in children with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome (LGS). Method: Fourteen patients underwent a total corpus callosotomy and 10 patients received VNS implantation. The patients were monitored for more than 12 months after treatment, and seizure rates and complications were retrospectively evaluated. Results: Seizure types among the 24 patients included atonic or tonic seizures with head-drops in 17 patients, generalized tonic seizures in two patients, atypical absence seizures in one patient, generalized tonic-clonic seizures in one patient, and myoclonic seizures in three patients. Of the 14 patients who underwent a corpus callosotomy, nine (64.3{\%}) had a greater than 50{\%} reduction in seizure frequency and five (35.7{\%}) had a greater than 75{\%} reduction. Of the 10 patients who underwent VNS implantation, seven (70.0{\%}) had a greater than 50{\%} reduction in seizure frequency and two (20.0{\%}) had a greater than 75{\%} reduction. There was no significant difference between the two procedures in terms of final efficacy. Complications of corpus callosotomy included aphasia in one patient, ataxia in another, and paresis in a third. Among patients receiving VNS, one patient experienced dyspnea while sleeping and one patient suffered from drooling. These complications were transient and tolerable, and were controlled by simple adjustments of VNS treatment parameters. Conclusion: The efficacy and safety of corpus callosotomy and VNS were comparable in children with LGS.",
author = "You, {Su Jeong} and Kang, {Hoon Chul} and Ko, {Tae Sung} and Kim, {Heung Dong} and Yum, {Mi Sun} and Hwang, {Yong Soon} and Lee, {Jung Kyo} and Kim, {Dong Suk} and Park, {Sang Keun}",
year = "2008",
month = "3",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.braindev.2007.07.013",
language = "English",
volume = "30",
pages = "195--199",
journal = "Brain and Development",
issn = "0387-7604",
publisher = "Elsevier",
number = "3",

}

Comparison of corpus callosotomy and vagus nerve stimulation in children with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome. / You, Su Jeong; Kang, Hoon Chul; Ko, Tae Sung; Kim, Heung Dong; Yum, Mi Sun; Hwang, Yong Soon; Lee, Jung Kyo; Kim, Dong Suk; Park, Sang Keun.

In: Brain and Development, Vol. 30, No. 3, 01.03.2008, p. 195-199.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Comparison of corpus callosotomy and vagus nerve stimulation in children with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome

AU - You, Su Jeong

AU - Kang, Hoon Chul

AU - Ko, Tae Sung

AU - Kim, Heung Dong

AU - Yum, Mi Sun

AU - Hwang, Yong Soon

AU - Lee, Jung Kyo

AU - Kim, Dong Suk

AU - Park, Sang Keun

PY - 2008/3/1

Y1 - 2008/3/1

N2 - Purpose: To compare the efficacy of corpus callosotomy and vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) for long-term adjunctive therapy in children with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome (LGS). Method: Fourteen patients underwent a total corpus callosotomy and 10 patients received VNS implantation. The patients were monitored for more than 12 months after treatment, and seizure rates and complications were retrospectively evaluated. Results: Seizure types among the 24 patients included atonic or tonic seizures with head-drops in 17 patients, generalized tonic seizures in two patients, atypical absence seizures in one patient, generalized tonic-clonic seizures in one patient, and myoclonic seizures in three patients. Of the 14 patients who underwent a corpus callosotomy, nine (64.3%) had a greater than 50% reduction in seizure frequency and five (35.7%) had a greater than 75% reduction. Of the 10 patients who underwent VNS implantation, seven (70.0%) had a greater than 50% reduction in seizure frequency and two (20.0%) had a greater than 75% reduction. There was no significant difference between the two procedures in terms of final efficacy. Complications of corpus callosotomy included aphasia in one patient, ataxia in another, and paresis in a third. Among patients receiving VNS, one patient experienced dyspnea while sleeping and one patient suffered from drooling. These complications were transient and tolerable, and were controlled by simple adjustments of VNS treatment parameters. Conclusion: The efficacy and safety of corpus callosotomy and VNS were comparable in children with LGS.

AB - Purpose: To compare the efficacy of corpus callosotomy and vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) for long-term adjunctive therapy in children with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome (LGS). Method: Fourteen patients underwent a total corpus callosotomy and 10 patients received VNS implantation. The patients were monitored for more than 12 months after treatment, and seizure rates and complications were retrospectively evaluated. Results: Seizure types among the 24 patients included atonic or tonic seizures with head-drops in 17 patients, generalized tonic seizures in two patients, atypical absence seizures in one patient, generalized tonic-clonic seizures in one patient, and myoclonic seizures in three patients. Of the 14 patients who underwent a corpus callosotomy, nine (64.3%) had a greater than 50% reduction in seizure frequency and five (35.7%) had a greater than 75% reduction. Of the 10 patients who underwent VNS implantation, seven (70.0%) had a greater than 50% reduction in seizure frequency and two (20.0%) had a greater than 75% reduction. There was no significant difference between the two procedures in terms of final efficacy. Complications of corpus callosotomy included aphasia in one patient, ataxia in another, and paresis in a third. Among patients receiving VNS, one patient experienced dyspnea while sleeping and one patient suffered from drooling. These complications were transient and tolerable, and were controlled by simple adjustments of VNS treatment parameters. Conclusion: The efficacy and safety of corpus callosotomy and VNS were comparable in children with LGS.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=39449105088&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=39449105088&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.braindev.2007.07.013

DO - 10.1016/j.braindev.2007.07.013

M3 - Article

C2 - 17825516

AN - SCOPUS:39449105088

VL - 30

SP - 195

EP - 199

JO - Brain and Development

JF - Brain and Development

SN - 0387-7604

IS - 3

ER -