Comparison of the effect of various chemical peeling agents on the skin barrier

Sekyoo Jeong, San Kim, Eun Hee Lee, Eung Ho Choi, Sung Ku Ahn, Seung Hun Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Among the various methods for chemical peeling, it is possible to select a wide range of peeling agents for particular patients. Objectives: The objective of present study was to investigate the effects of various chemical peeling agents on the epidermal permeability barrier of hairless mice skin and to clarify the histologic alteration in epidermal structure, thus to apply in the clinical practices. Methods: We have applied 35% and 70% glycolic acid (GA) aqueous solutions, 30% of salicylic acid (SA) solution of PEG400, Jessner's solution and 15%, 30% and 50% of trichloroacetic acid (TCA) aqueous solution to the flank of hairless mice. TEWL (trans-epidermal water loss) values were measured before and immediately after the application and 3, 6, 12 and 24 hours following treatment. Biopsy specimens were evaluated with light and electron microscopy for epidermal structural changes. Results: There were no significant changes in TEWL for the GA and SA solution treated skin, regardless of their concentration. For the TCA and Jessner's solution, TEWL increased immediately after treatment and recovered the basal levels about 90% after 24 hours for Jessner's solution and low concentrated TCA solution, but did not recovered for high concentrated TCA solution. On light and electron microscopic examination, exfoliating effect was seen in every case and as for SA and Jessner's solution treated skin, keratolysis at hair follicles was also seen. Slight epidermal necrosis was seen in every case, except in GA treated skin. Conclusion: The present results suggest that using topical agents such as glycolic acid can induce the change in the architecture of the epidermis without disrupting the skin barrier.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1181-1187
Number of pages7
JournalKorean Journal of Dermatology
Volume40
Issue number10
Publication statusPublished - 2002 Oct 1

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Keratolytic Agents
glycolic acid
Trichloroacetic Acid
Salicylic Acid
Skin
Hairless Mouse
Water
Light
Hair Follicle
Proxy
Epidermis
Permeability
Electron Microscopy
Necrosis
Electrons
Biopsy
Jessner's solution

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Dermatology

Cite this

Jeong, S., Kim, S., Lee, E. H., Choi, E. H., Ahn, S. K., & Lee, S. H. (2002). Comparison of the effect of various chemical peeling agents on the skin barrier. Korean Journal of Dermatology, 40(10), 1181-1187.
Jeong, Sekyoo ; Kim, San ; Lee, Eun Hee ; Choi, Eung Ho ; Ahn, Sung Ku ; Lee, Seung Hun. / Comparison of the effect of various chemical peeling agents on the skin barrier. In: Korean Journal of Dermatology. 2002 ; Vol. 40, No. 10. pp. 1181-1187.
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abstract = "Background: Among the various methods for chemical peeling, it is possible to select a wide range of peeling agents for particular patients. Objectives: The objective of present study was to investigate the effects of various chemical peeling agents on the epidermal permeability barrier of hairless mice skin and to clarify the histologic alteration in epidermal structure, thus to apply in the clinical practices. Methods: We have applied 35{\%} and 70{\%} glycolic acid (GA) aqueous solutions, 30{\%} of salicylic acid (SA) solution of PEG400, Jessner's solution and 15{\%}, 30{\%} and 50{\%} of trichloroacetic acid (TCA) aqueous solution to the flank of hairless mice. TEWL (trans-epidermal water loss) values were measured before and immediately after the application and 3, 6, 12 and 24 hours following treatment. Biopsy specimens were evaluated with light and electron microscopy for epidermal structural changes. Results: There were no significant changes in TEWL for the GA and SA solution treated skin, regardless of their concentration. For the TCA and Jessner's solution, TEWL increased immediately after treatment and recovered the basal levels about 90{\%} after 24 hours for Jessner's solution and low concentrated TCA solution, but did not recovered for high concentrated TCA solution. On light and electron microscopic examination, exfoliating effect was seen in every case and as for SA and Jessner's solution treated skin, keratolysis at hair follicles was also seen. Slight epidermal necrosis was seen in every case, except in GA treated skin. Conclusion: The present results suggest that using topical agents such as glycolic acid can induce the change in the architecture of the epidermis without disrupting the skin barrier.",
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Jeong, S, Kim, S, Lee, EH, Choi, EH, Ahn, SK & Lee, SH 2002, 'Comparison of the effect of various chemical peeling agents on the skin barrier', Korean Journal of Dermatology, vol. 40, no. 10, pp. 1181-1187.

Comparison of the effect of various chemical peeling agents on the skin barrier. / Jeong, Sekyoo; Kim, San; Lee, Eun Hee; Choi, Eung Ho; Ahn, Sung Ku; Lee, Seung Hun.

In: Korean Journal of Dermatology, Vol. 40, No. 10, 01.10.2002, p. 1181-1187.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Comparison of the effect of various chemical peeling agents on the skin barrier

AU - Jeong, Sekyoo

AU - Kim, San

AU - Lee, Eun Hee

AU - Choi, Eung Ho

AU - Ahn, Sung Ku

AU - Lee, Seung Hun

PY - 2002/10/1

Y1 - 2002/10/1

N2 - Background: Among the various methods for chemical peeling, it is possible to select a wide range of peeling agents for particular patients. Objectives: The objective of present study was to investigate the effects of various chemical peeling agents on the epidermal permeability barrier of hairless mice skin and to clarify the histologic alteration in epidermal structure, thus to apply in the clinical practices. Methods: We have applied 35% and 70% glycolic acid (GA) aqueous solutions, 30% of salicylic acid (SA) solution of PEG400, Jessner's solution and 15%, 30% and 50% of trichloroacetic acid (TCA) aqueous solution to the flank of hairless mice. TEWL (trans-epidermal water loss) values were measured before and immediately after the application and 3, 6, 12 and 24 hours following treatment. Biopsy specimens were evaluated with light and electron microscopy for epidermal structural changes. Results: There were no significant changes in TEWL for the GA and SA solution treated skin, regardless of their concentration. For the TCA and Jessner's solution, TEWL increased immediately after treatment and recovered the basal levels about 90% after 24 hours for Jessner's solution and low concentrated TCA solution, but did not recovered for high concentrated TCA solution. On light and electron microscopic examination, exfoliating effect was seen in every case and as for SA and Jessner's solution treated skin, keratolysis at hair follicles was also seen. Slight epidermal necrosis was seen in every case, except in GA treated skin. Conclusion: The present results suggest that using topical agents such as glycolic acid can induce the change in the architecture of the epidermis without disrupting the skin barrier.

AB - Background: Among the various methods for chemical peeling, it is possible to select a wide range of peeling agents for particular patients. Objectives: The objective of present study was to investigate the effects of various chemical peeling agents on the epidermal permeability barrier of hairless mice skin and to clarify the histologic alteration in epidermal structure, thus to apply in the clinical practices. Methods: We have applied 35% and 70% glycolic acid (GA) aqueous solutions, 30% of salicylic acid (SA) solution of PEG400, Jessner's solution and 15%, 30% and 50% of trichloroacetic acid (TCA) aqueous solution to the flank of hairless mice. TEWL (trans-epidermal water loss) values were measured before and immediately after the application and 3, 6, 12 and 24 hours following treatment. Biopsy specimens were evaluated with light and electron microscopy for epidermal structural changes. Results: There were no significant changes in TEWL for the GA and SA solution treated skin, regardless of their concentration. For the TCA and Jessner's solution, TEWL increased immediately after treatment and recovered the basal levels about 90% after 24 hours for Jessner's solution and low concentrated TCA solution, but did not recovered for high concentrated TCA solution. On light and electron microscopic examination, exfoliating effect was seen in every case and as for SA and Jessner's solution treated skin, keratolysis at hair follicles was also seen. Slight epidermal necrosis was seen in every case, except in GA treated skin. Conclusion: The present results suggest that using topical agents such as glycolic acid can induce the change in the architecture of the epidermis without disrupting the skin barrier.

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JF - Korean Journal of Dermatology

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