Comparison of the susceptibilities of Candida spp. to fluconazole and voriconazole in a 4-year global evaluation using disk diffusion

Global Antifungal Surveillance Group

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

79 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

From June 1997 to December 2001, results of in vitro susceptibility tests of yeast isolates from 35 countries were collected. For 2001 alone, fluconazole results were reported for 22,111 yeast isolates from 77 institutions in 30 countries. Of these isolates, 18,569 were also tested for susceptibility to voriconazole. All study sites tested clinical yeast isolates by recently endorsed NCCLS disk diffusion method M44-P. Disk test plates were automatically read and results were recorded with the BIOMIC Image Analysis System. Species, drug, zone diameter, susceptibility category, MIC, and quality control results were electronically submitted by e-mail quarterly for analysis. Duplicate test results (same patient and same species with same sensitivity-resistance profile and biotype results during any 7-day period) and uncontrolled test results were eliminated from this analysis. The proportion of Candida albicans isolates decreased from 69.7% in 1997 to 1998 to 63.0% in 2001, and this decrease was accompanied by a concomitant increase in C. tropicalis and C. parapsilosis. The susceptibility (susceptible [S]or susceptible-dose dependent [S-DD]) of C. albicans isolates to fluconazole was virtually unchanged, from 99.2% in 1997 to 99% in 2001; the C. glabrata response to fluconazole was unchanged, from 81.5% S or S-DD in 1997 to 81.7% in 2001, although the percentage of resistant isolates from blood and upper respiratory tract samples appeared to increase over the study period; the percentage of S C. parapsilosis isolates decreased slightly, from 98% S or S-DD in 1997 to 96% in 2001; and the percentage of S isolates of C. tropicalis increased slightly, from 95.7% in 1997 to 96.9% in 2001. The highest rate of resistance to fluconazole among C. albicans isolates was noted in Ecuador (7.6%, n = 250). Results from this investigation indicate that the susceptibility of yeast isolates to fluconazole has changed minimally worldwide over the 4.5-year study period and that voriconazole demonstrated 10- to 100-fold greater in vitro activity than fluconazole against most yeast species.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)5623-5632
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Clinical Microbiology
Volume41
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2003 Dec 1

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Fluconazole
Candida
Yeasts
Candida albicans
Ecuador
Postal Service
Quality Control
Respiratory System
Voriconazole
Pharmaceutical Preparations

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Microbiology (medical)

Cite this

@article{f04ac62c8d5b4a309eb3c062147a43ab,
title = "Comparison of the susceptibilities of Candida spp. to fluconazole and voriconazole in a 4-year global evaluation using disk diffusion",
abstract = "From June 1997 to December 2001, results of in vitro susceptibility tests of yeast isolates from 35 countries were collected. For 2001 alone, fluconazole results were reported for 22,111 yeast isolates from 77 institutions in 30 countries. Of these isolates, 18,569 were also tested for susceptibility to voriconazole. All study sites tested clinical yeast isolates by recently endorsed NCCLS disk diffusion method M44-P. Disk test plates were automatically read and results were recorded with the BIOMIC Image Analysis System. Species, drug, zone diameter, susceptibility category, MIC, and quality control results were electronically submitted by e-mail quarterly for analysis. Duplicate test results (same patient and same species with same sensitivity-resistance profile and biotype results during any 7-day period) and uncontrolled test results were eliminated from this analysis. The proportion of Candida albicans isolates decreased from 69.7{\%} in 1997 to 1998 to 63.0{\%} in 2001, and this decrease was accompanied by a concomitant increase in C. tropicalis and C. parapsilosis. The susceptibility (susceptible [S]or susceptible-dose dependent [S-DD]) of C. albicans isolates to fluconazole was virtually unchanged, from 99.2{\%} in 1997 to 99{\%} in 2001; the C. glabrata response to fluconazole was unchanged, from 81.5{\%} S or S-DD in 1997 to 81.7{\%} in 2001, although the percentage of resistant isolates from blood and upper respiratory tract samples appeared to increase over the study period; the percentage of S C. parapsilosis isolates decreased slightly, from 98{\%} S or S-DD in 1997 to 96{\%} in 2001; and the percentage of S isolates of C. tropicalis increased slightly, from 95.7{\%} in 1997 to 96.9{\%} in 2001. The highest rate of resistance to fluconazole among C. albicans isolates was noted in Ecuador (7.6{\%}, n = 250). Results from this investigation indicate that the susceptibility of yeast isolates to fluconazole has changed minimally worldwide over the 4.5-year study period and that voriconazole demonstrated 10- to 100-fold greater in vitro activity than fluconazole against most yeast species.",
author = "{Global Antifungal Surveillance Group} and Hazen, {Kevin C.} and Baron, {Ellen Jo} and Colombo, {Arnaldo Lopes} and Corrado Girmenia and Aurora Sanchez-Sousa and {Del Palacio}, Amalia and {De Bedout}, Catalina and Gibbs, {David L.} and Nora Tiraboschi and Jorge Finquelievich and David Ellis and Dominique Frameree and {Van Den Abeele}, {Anne Marie} and Robert Rennie and Steve Sanche and Hu Bijie and Yingchun Xu and Angela Restrepo and Ricardo Vega and Matilde Mendez and Nada Mallatova and Stanislava Dobiasova and Julio Ayabaca and Michele Mallie and E. Candolfi and Sequela, {J. P.} and Linas, {M. D.} and Bertrand Dupont and I. Braveny and G. Haase and Arne Rodloff and W. Bar and U. Gobel and George Petrikos and Erzsebet Puskas and Mestyan Gyula and Nagy Erzs{\'e}bet and Barcs Istv{\'a}n and Bajcsy Korhaz and M. Konkoly-Thege and Vivian Tullio and Domenico D'Antonio and Giorgio Scalise and Schito, {G. C.} and G. Fortina and Testore, {Gian Piero} and Eugenio, {Ospedale S.} and Pietro Martino and Kyungwon Lee and Peng, {Ng Kee}",
year = "2003",
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language = "English",
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Comparison of the susceptibilities of Candida spp. to fluconazole and voriconazole in a 4-year global evaluation using disk diffusion. / Global Antifungal Surveillance Group.

In: Journal of Clinical Microbiology, Vol. 41, No. 12, 01.12.2003, p. 5623-5632.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Comparison of the susceptibilities of Candida spp. to fluconazole and voriconazole in a 4-year global evaluation using disk diffusion

AU - Global Antifungal Surveillance Group

AU - Hazen, Kevin C.

AU - Baron, Ellen Jo

AU - Colombo, Arnaldo Lopes

AU - Girmenia, Corrado

AU - Sanchez-Sousa, Aurora

AU - Del Palacio, Amalia

AU - De Bedout, Catalina

AU - Gibbs, David L.

AU - Tiraboschi, Nora

AU - Finquelievich, Jorge

AU - Ellis, David

AU - Frameree, Dominique

AU - Van Den Abeele, Anne Marie

AU - Rennie, Robert

AU - Sanche, Steve

AU - Bijie, Hu

AU - Xu, Yingchun

AU - Restrepo, Angela

AU - Vega, Ricardo

AU - Mendez, Matilde

AU - Mallatova, Nada

AU - Dobiasova, Stanislava

AU - Ayabaca, Julio

AU - Mallie, Michele

AU - Candolfi, E.

AU - Sequela, J. P.

AU - Linas, M. D.

AU - Dupont, Bertrand

AU - Braveny, I.

AU - Haase, G.

AU - Rodloff, Arne

AU - Bar, W.

AU - Gobel, U.

AU - Petrikos, George

AU - Puskas, Erzsebet

AU - Gyula, Mestyan

AU - Erzsébet, Nagy

AU - István, Barcs

AU - Korhaz, Bajcsy

AU - Konkoly-Thege, M.

AU - Tullio, Vivian

AU - D'Antonio, Domenico

AU - Scalise, Giorgio

AU - Schito, G. C.

AU - Fortina, G.

AU - Testore, Gian Piero

AU - Eugenio, Ospedale S.

AU - Martino, Pietro

AU - Lee, Kyungwon

AU - Peng, Ng Kee

PY - 2003/12/1

Y1 - 2003/12/1

N2 - From June 1997 to December 2001, results of in vitro susceptibility tests of yeast isolates from 35 countries were collected. For 2001 alone, fluconazole results were reported for 22,111 yeast isolates from 77 institutions in 30 countries. Of these isolates, 18,569 were also tested for susceptibility to voriconazole. All study sites tested clinical yeast isolates by recently endorsed NCCLS disk diffusion method M44-P. Disk test plates were automatically read and results were recorded with the BIOMIC Image Analysis System. Species, drug, zone diameter, susceptibility category, MIC, and quality control results were electronically submitted by e-mail quarterly for analysis. Duplicate test results (same patient and same species with same sensitivity-resistance profile and biotype results during any 7-day period) and uncontrolled test results were eliminated from this analysis. The proportion of Candida albicans isolates decreased from 69.7% in 1997 to 1998 to 63.0% in 2001, and this decrease was accompanied by a concomitant increase in C. tropicalis and C. parapsilosis. The susceptibility (susceptible [S]or susceptible-dose dependent [S-DD]) of C. albicans isolates to fluconazole was virtually unchanged, from 99.2% in 1997 to 99% in 2001; the C. glabrata response to fluconazole was unchanged, from 81.5% S or S-DD in 1997 to 81.7% in 2001, although the percentage of resistant isolates from blood and upper respiratory tract samples appeared to increase over the study period; the percentage of S C. parapsilosis isolates decreased slightly, from 98% S or S-DD in 1997 to 96% in 2001; and the percentage of S isolates of C. tropicalis increased slightly, from 95.7% in 1997 to 96.9% in 2001. The highest rate of resistance to fluconazole among C. albicans isolates was noted in Ecuador (7.6%, n = 250). Results from this investigation indicate that the susceptibility of yeast isolates to fluconazole has changed minimally worldwide over the 4.5-year study period and that voriconazole demonstrated 10- to 100-fold greater in vitro activity than fluconazole against most yeast species.

AB - From June 1997 to December 2001, results of in vitro susceptibility tests of yeast isolates from 35 countries were collected. For 2001 alone, fluconazole results were reported for 22,111 yeast isolates from 77 institutions in 30 countries. Of these isolates, 18,569 were also tested for susceptibility to voriconazole. All study sites tested clinical yeast isolates by recently endorsed NCCLS disk diffusion method M44-P. Disk test plates were automatically read and results were recorded with the BIOMIC Image Analysis System. Species, drug, zone diameter, susceptibility category, MIC, and quality control results were electronically submitted by e-mail quarterly for analysis. Duplicate test results (same patient and same species with same sensitivity-resistance profile and biotype results during any 7-day period) and uncontrolled test results were eliminated from this analysis. The proportion of Candida albicans isolates decreased from 69.7% in 1997 to 1998 to 63.0% in 2001, and this decrease was accompanied by a concomitant increase in C. tropicalis and C. parapsilosis. The susceptibility (susceptible [S]or susceptible-dose dependent [S-DD]) of C. albicans isolates to fluconazole was virtually unchanged, from 99.2% in 1997 to 99% in 2001; the C. glabrata response to fluconazole was unchanged, from 81.5% S or S-DD in 1997 to 81.7% in 2001, although the percentage of resistant isolates from blood and upper respiratory tract samples appeared to increase over the study period; the percentage of S C. parapsilosis isolates decreased slightly, from 98% S or S-DD in 1997 to 96% in 2001; and the percentage of S isolates of C. tropicalis increased slightly, from 95.7% in 1997 to 96.9% in 2001. The highest rate of resistance to fluconazole among C. albicans isolates was noted in Ecuador (7.6%, n = 250). Results from this investigation indicate that the susceptibility of yeast isolates to fluconazole has changed minimally worldwide over the 4.5-year study period and that voriconazole demonstrated 10- to 100-fold greater in vitro activity than fluconazole against most yeast species.

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JF - Journal of Clinical Microbiology

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