Compassionate attitude towards others' suffering activates the mesolimbic neural system

Ji Woong Kim, Sung Eun Kim, Jae-Jin Kim, Bumseok Jeong, Chang Hyun Park, Ae Ree Son, Ji Eun Song, Seon Wan Ki

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

46 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Compassion is one of the essential components which enable individuals to enter into and maintain relationships of caring. Compassion tends to motivate us to help people who are emotionally suffering. It is also known that a feeling of intrinsic reward may occur as a result of experiencing compassion for others. We conducted this study to understand the neural nature of compassion for other people's emotional state. Twenty-one healthy normal volunteers participated in this study. We used a 2 × 2 factorial design in which each subject was asked to assume a compassionate attitude or passive attitude while viewing the sad or neutral facial affective pictures during functional magnetic imaging. The main effect of a compassionate attitude was observed in the medial frontal cortex, the subgenual frontal cortex, the inferior frontal cortex and the midbrain regions. A test of the interaction between a compassionate attitude and sad facial affect revealed significant activations in the midbrain-ventral striatum/septal network region. The results of this study suggest that taking a compassionate attitude towards other people's sad expressions modulate the activities of the midbrain-ventral striatum/septal region network, which is known to play a role in the prosocial/social approach motivation and its accompanied rewarding feeling.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2073-2081
Number of pages9
JournalNeuropsychologia
Volume47
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009 Aug 1

Fingerprint

Psychological Stress
Frontal Lobe
Mesencephalon
Septum of Brain
Healthy Volunteers
Emotions
Reward
Motivation
Ventral Striatum

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

Cite this

Kim, Ji Woong ; Kim, Sung Eun ; Kim, Jae-Jin ; Jeong, Bumseok ; Park, Chang Hyun ; Son, Ae Ree ; Song, Ji Eun ; Ki, Seon Wan. / Compassionate attitude towards others' suffering activates the mesolimbic neural system. In: Neuropsychologia. 2009 ; Vol. 47, No. 10. pp. 2073-2081.
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Compassionate attitude towards others' suffering activates the mesolimbic neural system. / Kim, Ji Woong; Kim, Sung Eun; Kim, Jae-Jin; Jeong, Bumseok; Park, Chang Hyun; Son, Ae Ree; Song, Ji Eun; Ki, Seon Wan.

In: Neuropsychologia, Vol. 47, No. 10, 01.08.2009, p. 2073-2081.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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