Complications of nephrotic syndrome

Se Jin Park, Jae Il Shin

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

38 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Nephrotic syndrome (NS) is one of the most common glomerular diseases that affect children. Renal histology reveals the presence of minimal change nephrotic syndrome (MCNS) in more than 80% of these patients. Most patients with MCNS have favorable outcomes without complications. However, a few of these children have lesions of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis, suffer from severe and prolonged proteinuria, and are at high risk for complications. Complications of NS are divided into two categories: disease-associated and drug-related complications. Disease-associated complications include infections (e.g., peritonitis, sepsis, cellulitis, and chicken pox), thromboembolism (e.g., venous thromboembolism and pulmonary embolism), hypovolemic crisis (e.g., abdominal pain, tachycardia, and hypotension), cardiovascular problems (e.g., hyperlipidemia), acute renal failure, anemia, and others (e.g., hypothyroidism, hypocalcemia, bone disease, and intussusception). The main pathomechanism of disease-associated complications originates from the large loss of plasma proteins in the urine of nephrotic children. The majority of children with MCNS who respond to treatment with corticosteroids or cytotoxic agents have smaller and milder complications than those with steroid-resistant NS. Corticosteroids, alkylating agents, cyclosporin A, and mycophenolate mofetil have often been used to treat NS, and these drugs have treatment-related complications. Early detection and appropriate treatment of these complications will improve outcomes for patients with NS.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)322-328
Number of pages7
JournalKorean Journal of Pediatrics
Volume54
Issue number8
Publication statusPublished - 2011 Jan 1

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Nephrotic Syndrome
Lipoid Nephrosis
Adrenal Cortex Hormones
Mycophenolic Acid
Focal Segmental Glomerulosclerosis
Hypovolemia
Cellulitis
Intussusception
Chickenpox
Hypocalcemia
Alkylating Agents
Bone Diseases
Thromboembolism
Venous Thromboembolism
Cytotoxins
Hypothyroidism
Hyperlipidemias
Peritonitis
Pulmonary Embolism
Proteinuria

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Pediatrics

Cite this

Jin Park, Se ; Il Shin, Jae. / Complications of nephrotic syndrome. In: Korean Journal of Pediatrics. 2011 ; Vol. 54, No. 8. pp. 322-328.
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Jin Park, S & Il Shin, J 2011, 'Complications of nephrotic syndrome', Korean Journal of Pediatrics, vol. 54, no. 8, pp. 322-328.

Complications of nephrotic syndrome. / Jin Park, Se; Il Shin, Jae.

In: Korean Journal of Pediatrics, Vol. 54, No. 8, 01.01.2011, p. 322-328.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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