Comprehensive Learning Curve of Robotic Surgery: Discovery From a Multicenter Prospective Trial of Robotic Gastrectomy

Min Seo Kim, Won Jun Kim, Woo Jin Hyung, Hyoung Il Kim, Sang Uk Han, Young Woo Kim, Keun Won Ryu, Sungsoo Park

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: To evaluate the complication-based learning curve and identify learning-associated complications of robotic gastrectomy. Summary Background Data: With the increased popularity of robotic surgery, a sound understanding of the learning curve in the surgical outcome of robotic surgery has taken on great importance. However, a multicenter prospective study analyzing learning-associated morbidity has never been conducted in robotic gastrectomy. Methods: Data on 502 robotic gastrectomy cases were prospectively collected from 5 surgeons. Risk-adjusted cumulative sum analysis was applied to visualize the learning curve of robotic gastrectomy on operation time and complications. Results: Twenty-five cases, on average,were needed to overcome complications and operation time-learning curve sufficiently to gain proficiency in 3 surgeons. An additional 23 cases were needed to cross the transitional phase to progress from proficiency tomastery. The moderate complication rate (CD≥grade II) was 20% in phase 1 (cases 1-25), 10% in phase 2 (cases 26-65), 26.1% in phase 3 (cases 66-88), and 6.4% in phase 4 (cases 89-125) (P < 0.001). Among diverse complications, CD ≥ grade II intra-abdominal bleeding (P < 0.001) and abdominal pain (P = 0.01) were identified as major learning-associated morbidities of robotic gastrectomy. Previous experience on laparoscopic surgery and mode of training influenced progression in the learning curve. Conclusions: This is the first study suggesting that technical immaturity substantially affects the surgical outcomes of robotic gastrectomy and that robotic gastrectomy is a complex procedure with a significant learning curve that has implications for physician training and credentialing.

Original languageEnglish
JournalAnnals of surgery
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2019 Jan 1

Fingerprint

Learning Curve
Robotics
Gastrectomy
Multicenter Studies
Learning
Credentialing
Morbidity
Laparoscopy
Abdominal Pain
Prospective Studies
Hemorrhage
Physicians

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery

Cite this

Kim, Min Seo ; Kim, Won Jun ; Hyung, Woo Jin ; Kim, Hyoung Il ; Han, Sang Uk ; Kim, Young Woo ; Ryu, Keun Won ; Park, Sungsoo. / Comprehensive Learning Curve of Robotic Surgery : Discovery From a Multicenter Prospective Trial of Robotic Gastrectomy. In: Annals of surgery. 2019.
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Comprehensive Learning Curve of Robotic Surgery : Discovery From a Multicenter Prospective Trial of Robotic Gastrectomy. / Kim, Min Seo; Kim, Won Jun; Hyung, Woo Jin; Kim, Hyoung Il; Han, Sang Uk; Kim, Young Woo; Ryu, Keun Won; Park, Sungsoo.

In: Annals of surgery, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Kim, Min Seo

AU - Kim, Won Jun

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AU - Kim, Hyoung Il

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AU - Kim, Young Woo

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AU - Park, Sungsoo

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N2 - Objective: To evaluate the complication-based learning curve and identify learning-associated complications of robotic gastrectomy. Summary Background Data: With the increased popularity of robotic surgery, a sound understanding of the learning curve in the surgical outcome of robotic surgery has taken on great importance. However, a multicenter prospective study analyzing learning-associated morbidity has never been conducted in robotic gastrectomy. Methods: Data on 502 robotic gastrectomy cases were prospectively collected from 5 surgeons. Risk-adjusted cumulative sum analysis was applied to visualize the learning curve of robotic gastrectomy on operation time and complications. Results: Twenty-five cases, on average,were needed to overcome complications and operation time-learning curve sufficiently to gain proficiency in 3 surgeons. An additional 23 cases were needed to cross the transitional phase to progress from proficiency tomastery. The moderate complication rate (CD≥grade II) was 20% in phase 1 (cases 1-25), 10% in phase 2 (cases 26-65), 26.1% in phase 3 (cases 66-88), and 6.4% in phase 4 (cases 89-125) (P < 0.001). Among diverse complications, CD ≥ grade II intra-abdominal bleeding (P < 0.001) and abdominal pain (P = 0.01) were identified as major learning-associated morbidities of robotic gastrectomy. Previous experience on laparoscopic surgery and mode of training influenced progression in the learning curve. Conclusions: This is the first study suggesting that technical immaturity substantially affects the surgical outcomes of robotic gastrectomy and that robotic gastrectomy is a complex procedure with a significant learning curve that has implications for physician training and credentialing.

AB - Objective: To evaluate the complication-based learning curve and identify learning-associated complications of robotic gastrectomy. Summary Background Data: With the increased popularity of robotic surgery, a sound understanding of the learning curve in the surgical outcome of robotic surgery has taken on great importance. However, a multicenter prospective study analyzing learning-associated morbidity has never been conducted in robotic gastrectomy. Methods: Data on 502 robotic gastrectomy cases were prospectively collected from 5 surgeons. Risk-adjusted cumulative sum analysis was applied to visualize the learning curve of robotic gastrectomy on operation time and complications. Results: Twenty-five cases, on average,were needed to overcome complications and operation time-learning curve sufficiently to gain proficiency in 3 surgeons. An additional 23 cases were needed to cross the transitional phase to progress from proficiency tomastery. The moderate complication rate (CD≥grade II) was 20% in phase 1 (cases 1-25), 10% in phase 2 (cases 26-65), 26.1% in phase 3 (cases 66-88), and 6.4% in phase 4 (cases 89-125) (P < 0.001). Among diverse complications, CD ≥ grade II intra-abdominal bleeding (P < 0.001) and abdominal pain (P = 0.01) were identified as major learning-associated morbidities of robotic gastrectomy. Previous experience on laparoscopic surgery and mode of training influenced progression in the learning curve. Conclusions: This is the first study suggesting that technical immaturity substantially affects the surgical outcomes of robotic gastrectomy and that robotic gastrectomy is a complex procedure with a significant learning curve that has implications for physician training and credentialing.

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