Consumer Differences in the United States and India on Wearable Trackers

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8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The purpose of this research was to compare consumers in the United States and India with different demographic backgrounds and to investigate their preferences, perceptions, attitudes, and behavioral intentions toward wearable trackers. An online survey was conducted and a series of independent t-tests, Welch's analysis of variance, and Duncan's post hoc test were performed to investigate differences among groups. Simple and multiple linear regression analyses were performed to investigate relationships among variables. The results demonstrated that there were significant differences in country of residence, gender, marital status, and age. Also, there were significant relationships among tracking attributes preferences, perceived usefulness and ease of use, attitudes on using, and the behavioral intention to use wearable trackers. These results can benefit developers and marketers of wearable trackers by increasing their knowledge of the differences among targeted consumer groups. The outcome could be to increase adoption of wearable trackers in the United States and India.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)40-56
Number of pages17
JournalFamily and Consumer Sciences Research Journal
Volume46
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017 Sep

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Dr. Koo is an Assistant Professor of Apparel Design at Konkuk University where she teaches fashion design courses. She worked at the University of California, Davis, before she moved to Konkuk University. She has conducted multidisciplinary-funded research projects on developing functional clothing for sports, protective garments for extreme environments, clothing for special markets, and smart clothing with sensors for health care. This paper was supported by Konkuk University in 2017. The author thanks the university for the funding.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2017 American Association of Family and Consumer Sciences

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Cultural Studies
  • Sociology and Political Science

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