Contributing factors of teenage pregnancy among African-American females living in economically disadvantaged communities

Lauren Summers, Young Me Lee, Hyeonkyeong Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Aim To identify contributing factors that increased the risk of pregnancy among African-American adolescent females living in economically disadvantaged communities and to evaluate the current pregnancy prevention programs addressing these factors in order to provide suggestions for the development of tailored pregnancy prevention programs for this target population. Background Pregnancy rates among adolescents in the United States have declined over the past several years. Despite this trend, the pregnancy rate for African-American adolescent females is disproportionately higher than the adolescent pregnancy rates for other ethnicities. Limited attempts have been made to compile and synthesize the factors that increase risk of pregnancy in this population or to evaluate the effectiveness of intervention programs for African-American females that incorporate these risk factors. Method An integrative literature review was conducted to identify the major contributing factors of pregnancy among African American adolescents living in economically disadvantaged areas. Results Of the identified contributing risk factors for early pregnancy among African-American adolescent females, the five most supported risk factors were: parental influence, peer influence, social messages, substance use including alcohol, and pregnancy desire. Twelve pregnancy prevention programs were identified that addressed one or more of the five contributing factors to pregnancy. Parental influence and social messages were the most addressed factors among these programs. Conclusions This review found five contributing factors related to teenage pregnancy; however, current intervention programs are not well addressed substance use as a component of alcohol use. Thus, development of a tailored pregnancy prevention program incorporating those factors will help decrease the high pregnancy rate among this target population.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)44-49
Number of pages6
JournalApplied Nursing Research
Volume37
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017 Oct 1

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Pregnancy in Adolescence
Vulnerable Populations
African Americans
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Rate
Health Services Needs and Demand
Alcohols
Program Evaluation

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Nursing(all)

Cite this

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Contributing factors of teenage pregnancy among African-American females living in economically disadvantaged communities. / Summers, Lauren; Lee, Young Me; Lee, Hyeonkyeong.

In: Applied Nursing Research, Vol. 37, 01.10.2017, p. 44-49.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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