Correlation of serial cardiac magnetic resonance imaging parameters with early resolution of ST-segment elevation after primary percutaneous coronary intervention

Jung Sun Kim, Young Guk Ko, Se Jung Yoon, Jae Youn Moon, Youngjin Kim, Wook Choi Byoung, Donghoon Choi, Yangsoo Jang

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Abstract

Background: The aim of the present study was to determine whether the parameters of cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI) might correlate with early ST-segment resolution (STR) after primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). Methods and Results: CMRI was performed in 45 STEMI patients (age: 56.6±13.0 years) at 8.2±8.0 days (early phase) and 3.3±1.1 months (late phase) after successful PCI. CMRI parameters were compared between 2 groups: ≥70% STR (group 1, n=21) and <70% STR (group 2, n=24). Both groups had similar baseline characteristics, except for a higher frequency of ≥2 myocardial blush grade and shorter pain-to-balloon time in group 1. Early-phase CMRI showed that persistent microvascular obstruction (PMO) (38.1% vs 91.7%, p<0.001) occurred less frequently and the percent infarct mass against total left ventricular (LV) mass (17.7±8.7% vs 29.1± 13.4%, p=0.001) was smaller in group 1. Late-phase CMRI revealed a significant increase in LV end-diastolic volume (-1.5±8.7 vs 14.5±25.5 ml, p=0.026) and reduced ejection fraction (55.0±9.9% vs 47.8±11.1%, p=0.027) in group 2. Conclusions: CMRI demonstrated that early STR might be related to PMO and infarct size, and predicts LV dysfunction and adverse LV remodeling. Also, early-phase CMRI findings are comparable to late-phase CMRI in association with early STR.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1621-1626
Number of pages6
JournalCirculation Journal
Volume72
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2008 Oct 3

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Percutaneous Coronary Intervention
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Ventricular Remodeling
Left Ventricular Dysfunction
Stroke Volume
Pain

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

@article{2962e86e59ee4b6ea85ff9e47ba0e61a,
title = "Correlation of serial cardiac magnetic resonance imaging parameters with early resolution of ST-segment elevation after primary percutaneous coronary intervention",
abstract = "Background: The aim of the present study was to determine whether the parameters of cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI) might correlate with early ST-segment resolution (STR) after primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). Methods and Results: CMRI was performed in 45 STEMI patients (age: 56.6±13.0 years) at 8.2±8.0 days (early phase) and 3.3±1.1 months (late phase) after successful PCI. CMRI parameters were compared between 2 groups: ≥70{\%} STR (group 1, n=21) and <70{\%} STR (group 2, n=24). Both groups had similar baseline characteristics, except for a higher frequency of ≥2 myocardial blush grade and shorter pain-to-balloon time in group 1. Early-phase CMRI showed that persistent microvascular obstruction (PMO) (38.1{\%} vs 91.7{\%}, p<0.001) occurred less frequently and the percent infarct mass against total left ventricular (LV) mass (17.7±8.7{\%} vs 29.1± 13.4{\%}, p=0.001) was smaller in group 1. Late-phase CMRI revealed a significant increase in LV end-diastolic volume (-1.5±8.7 vs 14.5±25.5 ml, p=0.026) and reduced ejection fraction (55.0±9.9{\%} vs 47.8±11.1{\%}, p=0.027) in group 2. Conclusions: CMRI demonstrated that early STR might be related to PMO and infarct size, and predicts LV dysfunction and adverse LV remodeling. Also, early-phase CMRI findings are comparable to late-phase CMRI in association with early STR.",
author = "Kim, {Jung Sun} and Ko, {Young Guk} and Yoon, {Se Jung} and Moon, {Jae Youn} and Youngjin Kim and Byoung, {Wook Choi} and Donghoon Choi and Yangsoo Jang",
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doi = "10.1253/circj.CJ-08-0232",
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Correlation of serial cardiac magnetic resonance imaging parameters with early resolution of ST-segment elevation after primary percutaneous coronary intervention. / Kim, Jung Sun; Ko, Young Guk; Yoon, Se Jung; Moon, Jae Youn; Kim, Youngjin; Byoung, Wook Choi; Choi, Donghoon; Jang, Yangsoo.

In: Circulation Journal, Vol. 72, No. 10, 03.10.2008, p. 1621-1626.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - Correlation of serial cardiac magnetic resonance imaging parameters with early resolution of ST-segment elevation after primary percutaneous coronary intervention

AU - Kim, Jung Sun

AU - Ko, Young Guk

AU - Yoon, Se Jung

AU - Moon, Jae Youn

AU - Kim, Youngjin

AU - Byoung, Wook Choi

AU - Choi, Donghoon

AU - Jang, Yangsoo

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N2 - Background: The aim of the present study was to determine whether the parameters of cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI) might correlate with early ST-segment resolution (STR) after primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). Methods and Results: CMRI was performed in 45 STEMI patients (age: 56.6±13.0 years) at 8.2±8.0 days (early phase) and 3.3±1.1 months (late phase) after successful PCI. CMRI parameters were compared between 2 groups: ≥70% STR (group 1, n=21) and <70% STR (group 2, n=24). Both groups had similar baseline characteristics, except for a higher frequency of ≥2 myocardial blush grade and shorter pain-to-balloon time in group 1. Early-phase CMRI showed that persistent microvascular obstruction (PMO) (38.1% vs 91.7%, p<0.001) occurred less frequently and the percent infarct mass against total left ventricular (LV) mass (17.7±8.7% vs 29.1± 13.4%, p=0.001) was smaller in group 1. Late-phase CMRI revealed a significant increase in LV end-diastolic volume (-1.5±8.7 vs 14.5±25.5 ml, p=0.026) and reduced ejection fraction (55.0±9.9% vs 47.8±11.1%, p=0.027) in group 2. Conclusions: CMRI demonstrated that early STR might be related to PMO and infarct size, and predicts LV dysfunction and adverse LV remodeling. Also, early-phase CMRI findings are comparable to late-phase CMRI in association with early STR.

AB - Background: The aim of the present study was to determine whether the parameters of cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI) might correlate with early ST-segment resolution (STR) after primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). Methods and Results: CMRI was performed in 45 STEMI patients (age: 56.6±13.0 years) at 8.2±8.0 days (early phase) and 3.3±1.1 months (late phase) after successful PCI. CMRI parameters were compared between 2 groups: ≥70% STR (group 1, n=21) and <70% STR (group 2, n=24). Both groups had similar baseline characteristics, except for a higher frequency of ≥2 myocardial blush grade and shorter pain-to-balloon time in group 1. Early-phase CMRI showed that persistent microvascular obstruction (PMO) (38.1% vs 91.7%, p<0.001) occurred less frequently and the percent infarct mass against total left ventricular (LV) mass (17.7±8.7% vs 29.1± 13.4%, p=0.001) was smaller in group 1. Late-phase CMRI revealed a significant increase in LV end-diastolic volume (-1.5±8.7 vs 14.5±25.5 ml, p=0.026) and reduced ejection fraction (55.0±9.9% vs 47.8±11.1%, p=0.027) in group 2. Conclusions: CMRI demonstrated that early STR might be related to PMO and infarct size, and predicts LV dysfunction and adverse LV remodeling. Also, early-phase CMRI findings are comparable to late-phase CMRI in association with early STR.

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