Cotransplantation of mouse neural stem cells (mNSCs) with adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells improves mNSC survival in a rat spinal cord injury model

Jin Soo Oh, Keung Nyun Kim, Sung Su An, William A. Pennan, Hyo Jin Kim, So Jung Gwak, Do Heum Yoon, Mi Hyun Lim, Byung Hyune Choi, Yoon Ha

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

42 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The low survival rate of graft stem cells after transplantation into recipient tissue is a major obstacle for successful stem cell therapy. After transplantation into the site of spinal cord injury, the stem cells face not only hypoxia due to low oxygen conditions, but also a lack of nutrients caused by damaged tissues and poor vascular supply. To improve the survival of therapeutic stem cells after grafting into the injured spinal cord, we examined the effects of cotransplanting mouse neural stem cells (mNSCs) and adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (AT-MSCs) on mNSC viability. The viability of mNSCs in coculture with ATMSCs was significantly increased compared to mNSCs alone in an in vitro injury model using serum deprivation (SD), hydrogen peroxide (H 2 o 2 ), and combined (SD + H 2 o 2 ) injury mimicking the ischemic environment of the injured spinal cord. We demonstrated that AT-MSCs inhibited the apoptosis of mNSCs in SD, H 2 o 2 , and combined injury models. Consistent with these in vitro results, mNSCs transplanted into rat spinal cords with AT-MSCs showed better survival rates than mNSCs transplanted alone. These findings suggest that cotransplantation of mNSCs with AT-MSCs may be a more effective transplantation protocol to improve the survival of cells transplanted into the injured spinal cord.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)837-849
Number of pages13
JournalCell transplantation
Volume20
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011 Aug 22

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Neural Stem Cells
Stem cells
Mesenchymal Stromal Cells
Spinal Cord Injuries
Adipose Tissue
Rats
Cell Survival
Tissue
Spinal Cord
Stem Cells
Wounds and Injuries
Transplantation
Serum
Stem Cell Transplantation
Cell- and Tissue-Based Therapy
Coculture Techniques
Hydrogen Peroxide
Blood Vessels
Apoptosis
Oxygen

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Cell Biology
  • Transplantation

Cite this

Oh, Jin Soo ; Kim, Keung Nyun ; An, Sung Su ; Pennan, William A. ; Kim, Hyo Jin ; Gwak, So Jung ; Yoon, Do Heum ; Lim, Mi Hyun ; Choi, Byung Hyune ; Ha, Yoon. / Cotransplantation of mouse neural stem cells (mNSCs) with adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells improves mNSC survival in a rat spinal cord injury model. In: Cell transplantation. 2011 ; Vol. 20, No. 6. pp. 837-849.
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Cotransplantation of mouse neural stem cells (mNSCs) with adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells improves mNSC survival in a rat spinal cord injury model. / Oh, Jin Soo; Kim, Keung Nyun; An, Sung Su; Pennan, William A.; Kim, Hyo Jin; Gwak, So Jung; Yoon, Do Heum; Lim, Mi Hyun; Choi, Byung Hyune; Ha, Yoon.

In: Cell transplantation, Vol. 20, No. 6, 22.08.2011, p. 837-849.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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