Craniofacial bone regeneration using iPS cell-derived neural crest like cells

Kazuko Kikuchi, Tomoyuki Masuda, Naoki Fujiwara, Akiyoshi Kuji, Hiroyuki Miura, Hansung Jung, Hidemitsu Harada, Keishi Otsu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells represent a powerful source for cell-based tissue regeneration because they are patient-specific cells and can differentiate into specialized cell types. Previously, we have demonstrated the derivation of neural crest like cells from iPS cells (iPS-NCLCs), and these cells have the potential to differentiate into dental mesenchymal cells, which subsequently differentiate into odontoblasts and dental pulp cells. In this study, we show that iPS-NCLCs can differentiate into mesenchymal stem cells (iPS-NCLC-MSCs), which contribute to craniofacial bone regeneration. iPS-NCLCs were cultured in serum-containing media and differentiated into functional MSCs, as confirmed by expression MSC markers and their ability to differentiate into osteoblasts, adipocytes, and chondrocytes in vitro. iPSNCLC- MSCs were negative for markers of undifferentiated iPS cells and did not develop into teratomas when transplanted to immunodeficient mice. Further, iPS-NCLC-MSCs grew normally and differentiated into osteoblasts on hydroxyapatite scaffolds in vitro. To assess the potential of iPS-NCLC-MSCs to regenerate craniofacial bone in vivo, iPS-NCLC-MSCs were transplanted into critical-size calvarial defects in immunodeficient mice for 8 weeks. Histological analysis revealed that iPS-NCLC-MSCs differentiated into osteoblasts and contributed to bone regeneration without tumor formation. These results indicate that iPS-NCLC-MSCs could be a potential candidate for cell-based craniofacial bone tissue repair and regeneration.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-10
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Hard Tissue Biology
Volume27
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018 Jan 1

Fingerprint

Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells
Bone Regeneration
Neural Crest
Stem cells
Osteoblasts
Bone
Tissue regeneration
Durapatite
Hydroxyapatite
Scaffolds
Pulp
Odontoblasts
Bone and Bones
Tumors
Dental Pulp
Repair
Teratoma
Tissue
Chondrocytes
Mesenchymal Stromal Cells

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Biochemistry
  • Biomaterials
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Dentistry(all)
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Kikuchi, Kazuko ; Masuda, Tomoyuki ; Fujiwara, Naoki ; Kuji, Akiyoshi ; Miura, Hiroyuki ; Jung, Hansung ; Harada, Hidemitsu ; Otsu, Keishi. / Craniofacial bone regeneration using iPS cell-derived neural crest like cells. In: Journal of Hard Tissue Biology. 2018 ; Vol. 27, No. 1. pp. 1-10.
@article{72ca3ade7e474c4188354281616e7fbd,
title = "Craniofacial bone regeneration using iPS cell-derived neural crest like cells",
abstract = "Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells represent a powerful source for cell-based tissue regeneration because they are patient-specific cells and can differentiate into specialized cell types. Previously, we have demonstrated the derivation of neural crest like cells from iPS cells (iPS-NCLCs), and these cells have the potential to differentiate into dental mesenchymal cells, which subsequently differentiate into odontoblasts and dental pulp cells. In this study, we show that iPS-NCLCs can differentiate into mesenchymal stem cells (iPS-NCLC-MSCs), which contribute to craniofacial bone regeneration. iPS-NCLCs were cultured in serum-containing media and differentiated into functional MSCs, as confirmed by expression MSC markers and their ability to differentiate into osteoblasts, adipocytes, and chondrocytes in vitro. iPSNCLC- MSCs were negative for markers of undifferentiated iPS cells and did not develop into teratomas when transplanted to immunodeficient mice. Further, iPS-NCLC-MSCs grew normally and differentiated into osteoblasts on hydroxyapatite scaffolds in vitro. To assess the potential of iPS-NCLC-MSCs to regenerate craniofacial bone in vivo, iPS-NCLC-MSCs were transplanted into critical-size calvarial defects in immunodeficient mice for 8 weeks. Histological analysis revealed that iPS-NCLC-MSCs differentiated into osteoblasts and contributed to bone regeneration without tumor formation. These results indicate that iPS-NCLC-MSCs could be a potential candidate for cell-based craniofacial bone tissue repair and regeneration.",
author = "Kazuko Kikuchi and Tomoyuki Masuda and Naoki Fujiwara and Akiyoshi Kuji and Hiroyuki Miura and Hansung Jung and Hidemitsu Harada and Keishi Otsu",
year = "2018",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.2485/jhtb.27.1",
language = "English",
volume = "27",
pages = "1--10",
journal = "Journal of Hard Tissue Biology",
issn = "1341-7649",
publisher = "Society of Hard Tissue Regenerative Biology",
number = "1",

}

Kikuchi, K, Masuda, T, Fujiwara, N, Kuji, A, Miura, H, Jung, H, Harada, H & Otsu, K 2018, 'Craniofacial bone regeneration using iPS cell-derived neural crest like cells', Journal of Hard Tissue Biology, vol. 27, no. 1, pp. 1-10. https://doi.org/10.2485/jhtb.27.1

Craniofacial bone regeneration using iPS cell-derived neural crest like cells. / Kikuchi, Kazuko; Masuda, Tomoyuki; Fujiwara, Naoki; Kuji, Akiyoshi; Miura, Hiroyuki; Jung, Hansung; Harada, Hidemitsu; Otsu, Keishi.

In: Journal of Hard Tissue Biology, Vol. 27, No. 1, 01.01.2018, p. 1-10.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Craniofacial bone regeneration using iPS cell-derived neural crest like cells

AU - Kikuchi, Kazuko

AU - Masuda, Tomoyuki

AU - Fujiwara, Naoki

AU - Kuji, Akiyoshi

AU - Miura, Hiroyuki

AU - Jung, Hansung

AU - Harada, Hidemitsu

AU - Otsu, Keishi

PY - 2018/1/1

Y1 - 2018/1/1

N2 - Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells represent a powerful source for cell-based tissue regeneration because they are patient-specific cells and can differentiate into specialized cell types. Previously, we have demonstrated the derivation of neural crest like cells from iPS cells (iPS-NCLCs), and these cells have the potential to differentiate into dental mesenchymal cells, which subsequently differentiate into odontoblasts and dental pulp cells. In this study, we show that iPS-NCLCs can differentiate into mesenchymal stem cells (iPS-NCLC-MSCs), which contribute to craniofacial bone regeneration. iPS-NCLCs were cultured in serum-containing media and differentiated into functional MSCs, as confirmed by expression MSC markers and their ability to differentiate into osteoblasts, adipocytes, and chondrocytes in vitro. iPSNCLC- MSCs were negative for markers of undifferentiated iPS cells and did not develop into teratomas when transplanted to immunodeficient mice. Further, iPS-NCLC-MSCs grew normally and differentiated into osteoblasts on hydroxyapatite scaffolds in vitro. To assess the potential of iPS-NCLC-MSCs to regenerate craniofacial bone in vivo, iPS-NCLC-MSCs were transplanted into critical-size calvarial defects in immunodeficient mice for 8 weeks. Histological analysis revealed that iPS-NCLC-MSCs differentiated into osteoblasts and contributed to bone regeneration without tumor formation. These results indicate that iPS-NCLC-MSCs could be a potential candidate for cell-based craniofacial bone tissue repair and regeneration.

AB - Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells represent a powerful source for cell-based tissue regeneration because they are patient-specific cells and can differentiate into specialized cell types. Previously, we have demonstrated the derivation of neural crest like cells from iPS cells (iPS-NCLCs), and these cells have the potential to differentiate into dental mesenchymal cells, which subsequently differentiate into odontoblasts and dental pulp cells. In this study, we show that iPS-NCLCs can differentiate into mesenchymal stem cells (iPS-NCLC-MSCs), which contribute to craniofacial bone regeneration. iPS-NCLCs were cultured in serum-containing media and differentiated into functional MSCs, as confirmed by expression MSC markers and their ability to differentiate into osteoblasts, adipocytes, and chondrocytes in vitro. iPSNCLC- MSCs were negative for markers of undifferentiated iPS cells and did not develop into teratomas when transplanted to immunodeficient mice. Further, iPS-NCLC-MSCs grew normally and differentiated into osteoblasts on hydroxyapatite scaffolds in vitro. To assess the potential of iPS-NCLC-MSCs to regenerate craniofacial bone in vivo, iPS-NCLC-MSCs were transplanted into critical-size calvarial defects in immunodeficient mice for 8 weeks. Histological analysis revealed that iPS-NCLC-MSCs differentiated into osteoblasts and contributed to bone regeneration without tumor formation. These results indicate that iPS-NCLC-MSCs could be a potential candidate for cell-based craniofacial bone tissue repair and regeneration.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85040100876&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85040100876&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.2485/jhtb.27.1

DO - 10.2485/jhtb.27.1

M3 - Article

VL - 27

SP - 1

EP - 10

JO - Journal of Hard Tissue Biology

JF - Journal of Hard Tissue Biology

SN - 1341-7649

IS - 1

ER -