Culturally sensitive interventions and health and behavioral health youth outcomes: A meta-analytic review

David R. Hodge, Kelly F. Jackson, Michael G. Vaughn

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Despite Census Bureau projections that youth from minority cultures will comprise the majority of the nation's youth in approximately a decade, little research has been conducted on culturally sensitive interventions (CSIs). Accordingly, this study sought to determine: (1) the effectiveness of CSIs designed to address health and behavioral health outcomes, (2) whether effectiveness varies depending on the class or type of outcome, and (3) whether race/ethnicity moderates effectiveness. The results suggest that CSIs (n = 21) are modestly effective (Hedges' g = .239, 95% C.I. = .139 to .339, p < .001). Effectiveness did not vary significantly by outcome class or by race/ethnicity. Especially in the latter case, however, the pattern of point estimates raises the possibility of moderation with an increase in power. Suggestions for future research conclude the article.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)401-423
Number of pages23
JournalSocial Work in Health Care
Volume49
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010 May 1

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Health
Censuses
Research

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Community and Home Care
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

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Culturally sensitive interventions and health and behavioral health youth outcomes : A meta-analytic review. / Hodge, David R.; Jackson, Kelly F.; Vaughn, Michael G.

In: Social Work in Health Care, Vol. 49, No. 5, 01.05.2010, p. 401-423.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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