Darling, Get Closer to Me: Spatial Proximity Amplifies Interpersonal Liking

Ji Eun Shin, Eun Kook Suh, Norman P. Li, Kangyong Eo, Sang Chul Chong, Ming Hong Tsai

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Does close distance increase liking for a social object? In a preliminary sociogram task, an association between proximity and intimacy was found in drawings of self and others. In three experimental studies, male participants consistently preferred female targets who were (actually or appeared to be) close than far from them. Distance was manipulated through various means—sitting distance (Study 2), presenting two facial images separately to each eye by a stereoscopic device (Study 3), or a video clip (Study 4). This effect was stronger among those with deprived social needs and occurred in part because close (vs. far) targets seemed psychologically more accessible to the perceiver. Our findings offer rare experimental evidence for the empirically challenged propinquity effect and provide new insights on how distance shapes inner experience.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)300-309
Number of pages10
JournalPersonality and Social Psychology Bulletin
Volume45
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019 Feb 1

Fingerprint

Surgical Instruments
Equipment and Supplies

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Social Psychology

Cite this

Shin, Ji Eun ; Suh, Eun Kook ; Li, Norman P. ; Eo, Kangyong ; Chong, Sang Chul ; Tsai, Ming Hong. / Darling, Get Closer to Me : Spatial Proximity Amplifies Interpersonal Liking. In: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin. 2019 ; Vol. 45, No. 2. pp. 300-309.
@article{a06af370e8434a6da098b5fd00daa51d,
title = "Darling, Get Closer to Me: Spatial Proximity Amplifies Interpersonal Liking",
abstract = "Does close distance increase liking for a social object? In a preliminary sociogram task, an association between proximity and intimacy was found in drawings of self and others. In three experimental studies, male participants consistently preferred female targets who were (actually or appeared to be) close than far from them. Distance was manipulated through various means—sitting distance (Study 2), presenting two facial images separately to each eye by a stereoscopic device (Study 3), or a video clip (Study 4). This effect was stronger among those with deprived social needs and occurred in part because close (vs. far) targets seemed psychologically more accessible to the perceiver. Our findings offer rare experimental evidence for the empirically challenged propinquity effect and provide new insights on how distance shapes inner experience.",
author = "Shin, {Ji Eun} and Suh, {Eun Kook} and Li, {Norman P.} and Kangyong Eo and Chong, {Sang Chul} and Tsai, {Ming Hong}",
year = "2019",
month = "2",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1177/0146167218784903",
language = "English",
volume = "45",
pages = "300--309",
journal = "Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin",
issn = "0146-1672",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Inc.",
number = "2",

}

Darling, Get Closer to Me : Spatial Proximity Amplifies Interpersonal Liking. / Shin, Ji Eun; Suh, Eun Kook; Li, Norman P.; Eo, Kangyong; Chong, Sang Chul; Tsai, Ming Hong.

In: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Vol. 45, No. 2, 01.02.2019, p. 300-309.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Darling, Get Closer to Me

T2 - Spatial Proximity Amplifies Interpersonal Liking

AU - Shin, Ji Eun

AU - Suh, Eun Kook

AU - Li, Norman P.

AU - Eo, Kangyong

AU - Chong, Sang Chul

AU - Tsai, Ming Hong

PY - 2019/2/1

Y1 - 2019/2/1

N2 - Does close distance increase liking for a social object? In a preliminary sociogram task, an association between proximity and intimacy was found in drawings of self and others. In three experimental studies, male participants consistently preferred female targets who were (actually or appeared to be) close than far from them. Distance was manipulated through various means—sitting distance (Study 2), presenting two facial images separately to each eye by a stereoscopic device (Study 3), or a video clip (Study 4). This effect was stronger among those with deprived social needs and occurred in part because close (vs. far) targets seemed psychologically more accessible to the perceiver. Our findings offer rare experimental evidence for the empirically challenged propinquity effect and provide new insights on how distance shapes inner experience.

AB - Does close distance increase liking for a social object? In a preliminary sociogram task, an association between proximity and intimacy was found in drawings of self and others. In three experimental studies, male participants consistently preferred female targets who were (actually or appeared to be) close than far from them. Distance was manipulated through various means—sitting distance (Study 2), presenting two facial images separately to each eye by a stereoscopic device (Study 3), or a video clip (Study 4). This effect was stronger among those with deprived social needs and occurred in part because close (vs. far) targets seemed psychologically more accessible to the perceiver. Our findings offer rare experimental evidence for the empirically challenged propinquity effect and provide new insights on how distance shapes inner experience.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85050198282&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85050198282&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1177/0146167218784903

DO - 10.1177/0146167218784903

M3 - Article

C2 - 30022706

AN - SCOPUS:85050198282

VL - 45

SP - 300

EP - 309

JO - Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin

JF - Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin

SN - 0146-1672

IS - 2

ER -