Decoding intravesical pressure from local field potentials in rat lumbosacral spinal cord

Changkyun Im, Hae Yong Park, Chin Su Koh, Sang Baek Ryu, In Seok Seo, Yong Jung Kim, Kyung Hwan Kim, Hyung Cheul Shin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Chronic monitoring of intravesical pressure is required to detect the onset of intravesical hypertension and the progression of a more severe condition. Recent reports demonstrate the bladder state can be monitored from the spiking activity of the dorsal root ganglia or lumbosacral spinal cord. However, one of the most serious challenges for these methods is the difficulty of sustained spike signal acquisition due to the high-electrode-location-sensitivity of spikes or neuro-degeneration. Alternatively, it has been demonstrated that local field potential recordings are less affected by encapsulation reactions or electrode location changes. Here, we hypothesized that local field potential (LFP) from the lumbosacral dorsal horn may provide information concerning the intravesical pressure. LFP and spike activities were simultaneously recorded from the lumbosacral spinal cord of anesthetized rats during bladder filling. The results show that the LFP activities carry significant information about intravesical pressure along with spiking activities. Importantly, the intravesical pressure is decoded from the power in high-frequency bands (83.9-256 Hz) with a substantial performance similar to that of the spike train decoding. These findings demonstrate that high-frequency LFP activity can be an alternative intravesical pressure monitoring signal, which could lead to a proper closed loop system for urinary control.

Original languageEnglish
Article number056005
JournalJournal of Neural Engineering
Volume13
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016 Aug 12

Fingerprint

Decoding
Rats
Spinal Cord
Pressure
Electrodes
Urinary Bladder
Monitoring
Spinal Ganglia
Encapsulation
Closed loop systems
Action Potentials
Frequency bands
Hypertension

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

Cite this

Im, C., Park, H. Y., Koh, C. S., Ryu, S. B., Seo, I. S., Kim, Y. J., ... Shin, H. C. (2016). Decoding intravesical pressure from local field potentials in rat lumbosacral spinal cord. Journal of Neural Engineering, 13(5), [056005]. https://doi.org/10.1088/1741-2560/13/5/056005
Im, Changkyun ; Park, Hae Yong ; Koh, Chin Su ; Ryu, Sang Baek ; Seo, In Seok ; Kim, Yong Jung ; Kim, Kyung Hwan ; Shin, Hyung Cheul. / Decoding intravesical pressure from local field potentials in rat lumbosacral spinal cord. In: Journal of Neural Engineering. 2016 ; Vol. 13, No. 5.
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Decoding intravesical pressure from local field potentials in rat lumbosacral spinal cord. / Im, Changkyun; Park, Hae Yong; Koh, Chin Su; Ryu, Sang Baek; Seo, In Seok; Kim, Yong Jung; Kim, Kyung Hwan; Shin, Hyung Cheul.

In: Journal of Neural Engineering, Vol. 13, No. 5, 056005, 12.08.2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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