Defining an international cut-off of two-legged countermovement jump power for sarcopenia and dysmobility syndrome

N. Hong, E. Siglinsky, D. Krueger, R. White, C. O. Kim, H. C. Kim, Y. Yeom, N. Binkley, Y. Rhee, B. Buehring

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Summary: We aimed to establish jump power cut-offs for the composite outcome of either sarcopenia (EWGSOP2) or dysmobility syndrome using Asian and Caucasian cohorts. Estimated cut-offs were sex specific (women: < 19.0 W/kg; men: < 23.8 W/kg) but not ethnicity specific. Jump power has potential to be used in definitions of poor musculoskeletal health. Purpose: Weight-corrected jump power measured during a countermovement jump may be a useful tool to identify individuals with poor musculoskeletal health, but no cut-off values exist. We aimed to establish jump power cut-offs for detecting individuals with either sarcopenia or dysmobility syndrome. Methods: Age- and sex-matched community-dwelling older adults from two cohorts (University of Wisconsin-Madison [UW], Korean Urban Rural Elderly cohort [KURE], 1:2) were analyzed. Jump power cut-offs for the composite outcome of either sarcopenia defined by EWGSOP2 or dysmobility syndrome were determined. Results: The UW (n = 95) and KURE (n = 190) cohorts were similar in age (mean 75 years) and sex distribution (68% women). Jump power was similar between KURE and UW women (19.7 vs. 18.6 W/kg, p = 0.096) and slightly higher in KURE than UW in men (26.9 vs. 24.8 W/kg, p = 0.050). In UW and KURE, the prevalence of sarcopenia (7.4% in both), dysmobility syndrome (31.6% and 27.9%), or composite of either sarcopenia or dysmobility syndrome (32.6% and 28.4%) were comparable. Low jump power cut-offs for the composite outcome differed by sex but not by ethnicity (< 19.0 W/kg in women; < 23.8 W/kg in men). Low jump power was associated with elevated odds of sarcopenia (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 4.07), dysmobility syndrome (aOR 4.32), or the composite of sarcopenia or dysmobility syndrome (aOR 4.67, p < 0.01 for all) independent of age, sex, height, and ethnicity. Conclusion: Sex-specific jump power cut-offs were found to detect the presence of either sarcopenia or dysmobility syndrome in older adults independent of Asian or Caucasian ethnicity.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)483-493
Number of pages11
JournalOsteoporosis International
Volume32
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2021 Mar

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Dr. Buehring reports grants from MSD, Kinemed and GE/Lunar related to the current work. Additionally, he reports grants and personal fees from Lilly, grants from Extendicare Foundation, personal fees from GE Healthcare, personal fees from UCB, Janssen, Gilead and AbbVie outside the submitted work. Ms. Krueger reports research grants from Radius and personal fees from Amgen outside the submitted work. Dr. Binkley reports grants from Radius, RTI Health Solutions, and GE Healthcare and personal fees from Amgen and Taurus, all outside of the submitted work. Dr. Rhee reports personal fees from Amgen outside of the submitted work. All other authors report no conflict of interest.

Funding Information:
This research was funded by Research of Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2012-E63001-001, 2013-E63007-00, 2013-E63007-01, 2013-E63007-02, 2013-ER6302-00). Open Access funding provided by Projekt DEAL.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2020, The Author(s).

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

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