Detection and quantification of pharaoh ant antigens in household dust samples as newly identified aeroallergens

Cheol Woo Kim, Jae Seok Song, Soo Young Choi, Jungwon Park, Chein Soo Hong

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The widespread house ant, Monomorium pharaonis (pharaoh ant, PA), was recently identified as a potential cause of respiratory allergies. However, there are no reports of the distribution of PA allergens in various environments. We developed specific ELISA inhibition assays and measured the distribution and amount of PA antigens in household dust samples. Methods: Floor dust was collected at 3-month intervals from 56 homes in Seoul over a 1-year period. PA antigens in fine dusts were quantified by ELISA inhibition assays using rabbit anti-PA sera, and specific IgE to PA antigens in residents' serum was measured by ELISA. Results: In 18 of the 56 homes (32.1%), PA antigen was detected in at least 1 floor dust sample either from the living room or the kitchen. Levels of PA antigens showed seasonal variations with peaks in autumn and winter. The detection rate of PA antigens was significantly higher in homes with visual evidence of PA infestations (70%) than in homes without such infestations (23.9%; p < 0.05). However, a significant amount of PA antigens was still detected in uninfested homes. Thirteen of 113 (11.5%) residents were positive for PA-specific IgE. PA-specific IgE was detected more frequently in residents living in PA antigen-positive homes (19.6%) than in antigen-negative homes (4.8%; p < 0.05). Conclusion: A considerable level of PA antigens is distributed in the indoor environment. Therefore, inhalant exposure to PA antigens can occur during domestic activities. These results suggest that PAs might be a significant source of aeroallergens in households.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)247-253
Number of pages7
JournalInternational Archives of Allergy and Immunology
Volume144
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2007 Oct 1

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Ants
Dust
Antigens
Immunoglobulin E
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Serum

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology

Cite this

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title = "Detection and quantification of pharaoh ant antigens in household dust samples as newly identified aeroallergens",
abstract = "Background: The widespread house ant, Monomorium pharaonis (pharaoh ant, PA), was recently identified as a potential cause of respiratory allergies. However, there are no reports of the distribution of PA allergens in various environments. We developed specific ELISA inhibition assays and measured the distribution and amount of PA antigens in household dust samples. Methods: Floor dust was collected at 3-month intervals from 56 homes in Seoul over a 1-year period. PA antigens in fine dusts were quantified by ELISA inhibition assays using rabbit anti-PA sera, and specific IgE to PA antigens in residents' serum was measured by ELISA. Results: In 18 of the 56 homes (32.1{\%}), PA antigen was detected in at least 1 floor dust sample either from the living room or the kitchen. Levels of PA antigens showed seasonal variations with peaks in autumn and winter. The detection rate of PA antigens was significantly higher in homes with visual evidence of PA infestations (70{\%}) than in homes without such infestations (23.9{\%}; p < 0.05). However, a significant amount of PA antigens was still detected in uninfested homes. Thirteen of 113 (11.5{\%}) residents were positive for PA-specific IgE. PA-specific IgE was detected more frequently in residents living in PA antigen-positive homes (19.6{\%}) than in antigen-negative homes (4.8{\%}; p < 0.05). Conclusion: A considerable level of PA antigens is distributed in the indoor environment. Therefore, inhalant exposure to PA antigens can occur during domestic activities. These results suggest that PAs might be a significant source of aeroallergens in households.",
author = "Kim, {Cheol Woo} and Song, {Jae Seok} and Choi, {Soo Young} and Jungwon Park and Hong, {Chein Soo}",
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Detection and quantification of pharaoh ant antigens in household dust samples as newly identified aeroallergens. / Kim, Cheol Woo; Song, Jae Seok; Choi, Soo Young; Park, Jungwon; Hong, Chein Soo.

In: International Archives of Allergy and Immunology, Vol. 144, No. 3, 01.10.2007, p. 247-253.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - Detection and quantification of pharaoh ant antigens in household dust samples as newly identified aeroallergens

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AU - Hong, Chein Soo

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N2 - Background: The widespread house ant, Monomorium pharaonis (pharaoh ant, PA), was recently identified as a potential cause of respiratory allergies. However, there are no reports of the distribution of PA allergens in various environments. We developed specific ELISA inhibition assays and measured the distribution and amount of PA antigens in household dust samples. Methods: Floor dust was collected at 3-month intervals from 56 homes in Seoul over a 1-year period. PA antigens in fine dusts were quantified by ELISA inhibition assays using rabbit anti-PA sera, and specific IgE to PA antigens in residents' serum was measured by ELISA. Results: In 18 of the 56 homes (32.1%), PA antigen was detected in at least 1 floor dust sample either from the living room or the kitchen. Levels of PA antigens showed seasonal variations with peaks in autumn and winter. The detection rate of PA antigens was significantly higher in homes with visual evidence of PA infestations (70%) than in homes without such infestations (23.9%; p < 0.05). However, a significant amount of PA antigens was still detected in uninfested homes. Thirteen of 113 (11.5%) residents were positive for PA-specific IgE. PA-specific IgE was detected more frequently in residents living in PA antigen-positive homes (19.6%) than in antigen-negative homes (4.8%; p < 0.05). Conclusion: A considerable level of PA antigens is distributed in the indoor environment. Therefore, inhalant exposure to PA antigens can occur during domestic activities. These results suggest that PAs might be a significant source of aeroallergens in households.

AB - Background: The widespread house ant, Monomorium pharaonis (pharaoh ant, PA), was recently identified as a potential cause of respiratory allergies. However, there are no reports of the distribution of PA allergens in various environments. We developed specific ELISA inhibition assays and measured the distribution and amount of PA antigens in household dust samples. Methods: Floor dust was collected at 3-month intervals from 56 homes in Seoul over a 1-year period. PA antigens in fine dusts were quantified by ELISA inhibition assays using rabbit anti-PA sera, and specific IgE to PA antigens in residents' serum was measured by ELISA. Results: In 18 of the 56 homes (32.1%), PA antigen was detected in at least 1 floor dust sample either from the living room or the kitchen. Levels of PA antigens showed seasonal variations with peaks in autumn and winter. The detection rate of PA antigens was significantly higher in homes with visual evidence of PA infestations (70%) than in homes without such infestations (23.9%; p < 0.05). However, a significant amount of PA antigens was still detected in uninfested homes. Thirteen of 113 (11.5%) residents were positive for PA-specific IgE. PA-specific IgE was detected more frequently in residents living in PA antigen-positive homes (19.6%) than in antigen-negative homes (4.8%; p < 0.05). Conclusion: A considerable level of PA antigens is distributed in the indoor environment. Therefore, inhalant exposure to PA antigens can occur during domestic activities. These results suggest that PAs might be a significant source of aeroallergens in households.

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