Detrital zircon U-Pb and Hf isotope characteristics of the Early Neoproterozoic successions in the central-western Korean Peninsula: Implication for the Precambrian tectonic history of East Asia

Sung Won Kim, Sanghoon Kwon, M. Santosh, Deung Lyong Cho, Weon Seo Kee, Seung Bae Lee, Youn Joong Jeong

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19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The Early Neoproterozoic successions in the central–western Korean Peninsula preserve important geological records of the Late Paleoproterozoic to Mesoproterozoic events associated with the disruption of the Columbia supercontinent, and the amalgamation and disruption of the Rodinia supercontinent. In this study, we present SHRIMP and LA–MC–ICPMS U-Pb ages and Hf isotope signatures of detrital zircon grains from metasedimentary rocks of the Jangbong Formation in the Hongseong-Imjingang Belt and the Sangwon System in the Nangnim Massif. Most zircon grains from all the samples are magmatic in origin, yielding similar U-Pb age spectra ranging from Neoarchean to Late Mesoproterozoic or Early Neoproterozoic, with multiple age peaks within the Late Paleoproterozoic to Mesoproterozoic range (ca. 1876 Ma, ca. 1744 Ma, ca. 1578 Ma, and ca. 1168 Ma in the Jangbong Formation and ca. 1754 Ma, ca. 1588 Ma, ca. 1450 Ma, and ca. 1160 Ma in the Sangwon System). The maximum ages of deposition estimated from the youngest concordant detrital zircons are ca. 1.0 – 0.96 Ga from the Jangbong Formation and ca. 0.98 Ga from the Sangwon System. Ages and Hf isotope signatures of dominant Late Paleoproterozoic to Mesoproterozoic detrital zircon populations reflect magmatic history involving juvenile input and crustal reworking. In contrast, the minor magmatic detrital zircon populations with Neoarchean to Middle Paleoproterozoic ages show negligible contribution from basement source materials of the adjacent Gyeonggi and Nangnim massifs. The dominant Late Paleoproterozoic to Mesoproterozoic zircon populations examined in this study in conjunction with available data from the Korean Peninsula correlate with the geological and geochronological evidence from the North China Craton associated with rifting along the northeastern margin of the southeastern domain of the Columbia during the Late Paleoproterozoic to Early Neoproterozoic.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)24-41
Number of pages18
JournalPrecambrian Research
Volume322
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019 Mar

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This work was supported by a Basic Research Project (GP2017-021; Development of integrated geological information based on digital mapping) of the Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources (KIGAM), funded by the Ministry of Science and ICT (Information, Communication and Technology). SK acknowledged partial supports from the 2017R1A6A1A07015374 (Multidisciplinary study for assessment of large earthquake potentials in the Korean Peninsula) and 2015R1D1A1A09058914 through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry of Science and ICT, Korea. S.W. Kim, S. Kwon and D.L. Cho equally contribute to the final manuscript.

Funding Information:
This work was supported by a Basic Research Project (GP2017-021; Development of integrated geological information based on digital mapping) of the Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources ( KIGAM ), funded by the Ministry of Science and ICT (Information, Communication and Technology). SK acknowledged partial supports from the 2017R1A6A1A07015374 (Multidisciplinary study for assessment of large earthquake potentials in the Korean Peninsula) and 2015R1D1A1A09058914 through the National Research Foundation of Korea ( NRF ) funded by the Ministry of Science and ICT, Korea. S.W. Kim, S. Kwon and D.L. Cho equally contribute to the final manuscript.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2018 Elsevier B.V.

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Geology
  • Geochemistry and Petrology

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