Developing palatal bone using human mesenchymal stem cell and stem cells from exfoliated deciduous teeth cell sheets

Jong Min Lee, Hyun Yi Kim, Jin Sung Park, Dong Joon Lee, Sushan Zhang, David William Green, Teruo Okano, Jeong Ho Hong, Hansung Jung

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Cleft palate is one of the most common craniofacial defects in newborn babies. The characteristics of this genetic disease produce soft and hard tissue defects on the lip and maxilla, which cause not only aesthetic but also functional problems with speech, eating, and breathing. Bone grafts using autologous cancellous bone have been a standard treatment to repair the hard tissue defect in cleft palates. However, such grafts do not fully integrate into host bone and undergo resorption. To overcome engraftment problems, it is common to engineer new tissues with a combination of multipotent cells and biomaterial frameworks. Here, we manufactured cell sheets for bone repair of cleft palates derived from two osteogenic cell sources, human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) and stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHEDs). Cell sheets made from hMSCs and SHEDs gave rise to in vitro calcification, which indicated the osteogenic potential of these cells. The cell sheets of hMSCs and SHEDs expressed the bone-specific osteogenic markers, osterix, osteocalcin, and osteopontin, following insertion into ex vivo-cultured embryonic palatal shelves and in ovo culture. In conclusion, we showed that osteogenic stem cell sheets have mineralization potential and might represent a new alternative to autologous bone transplantation in the reconstruction of cleft palates.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)319-327
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine
Volume13
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019 Feb 1

Fingerprint

Deciduous Tooth
Stem cells
Mesenchymal Stromal Cells
Bone
Stem Cells
Cleft Palate
Bone and Bones
Tissue
Grafts
Defects
Repair
Transplants
Inborn Genetic Diseases
Osteopontin
Bone Transplantation
Autologous Transplantation
Osteocalcin
Maxilla
Biocompatible Materials
Bone Resorption

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Biomaterials
  • Biomedical Engineering

Cite this

Lee, Jong Min ; Kim, Hyun Yi ; Park, Jin Sung ; Lee, Dong Joon ; Zhang, Sushan ; Green, David William ; Okano, Teruo ; Hong, Jeong Ho ; Jung, Hansung. / Developing palatal bone using human mesenchymal stem cell and stem cells from exfoliated deciduous teeth cell sheets. In: Journal of Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine. 2019 ; Vol. 13, No. 2. pp. 319-327.
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Developing palatal bone using human mesenchymal stem cell and stem cells from exfoliated deciduous teeth cell sheets. / Lee, Jong Min; Kim, Hyun Yi; Park, Jin Sung; Lee, Dong Joon; Zhang, Sushan; Green, David William; Okano, Teruo; Hong, Jeong Ho; Jung, Hansung.

In: Journal of Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine, Vol. 13, No. 2, 01.02.2019, p. 319-327.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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