Development of hydrophilic dental wax without surfactant using a non-thermal air atmospheric pressure plasma jet

Jung Hwan Lee, Yong Hee Kim, Eun Ha Choi, Kwang Mahn Kim, Kyoung Nam Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Dental wax (DW), a low-melting and high-molecular-weight organic mixture, is widely used in dentistry for forming moulds of teeth. Hydrophilicity is an important property for DW, as a wet dental investment is used to surround the wax before wax burnout is performed. However, recent attempts to improve the hydrophilicity of DW using a surfactant have resulted in the reduced mechanical properties of the dental investment, leading to the failure of the dental restoration. This study applied a non-thermal air atmospheric pressure plasma jet (AAPPJ) for DW surface treatment and investigated its effect on both DW hydrophilicity and the dental investment's mechanical properties. The results showed that the application of the AAPPJ significantly improved the hydrophilicity of the DW, and that the results were similar to that of cleaner-treated DW using commercially available products with surfactant. A surface chemical analysis indicated that the improvement of hydrophilicity was related to an increase in the number of oxygen-related bonds on the DW surface following the removal of carbon hydrate in both AAPPJ and cleaner-treated DW. However, cleaner treatment compromised the mechanical property of the dental investment when the dental investment was in contact with the treated DW, while the AAPPJ treatment did not. Therefore, the use of AAPPJ to treat DW is a promising method for accurate dental restoration, as it induces an improvement in hydrophilicity without harming the dental investment.

Original languageEnglish
Article number235402
JournalJournal of Physics D: Applied Physics
Volume47
Issue number23
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014 Jun 11

Fingerprint

Plasma jets
waxes
Waxes
Surface-Active Agents
plasma jets
Atmospheric pressure
atmospheric pressure
Surface active agents
surfactants
air
Air
Hydrophilicity
cleaners
mechanical properties
restoration
Mechanical properties
Restoration
dentistry
burnout
Dentistry

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Acoustics and Ultrasonics
  • Surfaces, Coatings and Films

Cite this

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title = "Development of hydrophilic dental wax without surfactant using a non-thermal air atmospheric pressure plasma jet",
abstract = "Dental wax (DW), a low-melting and high-molecular-weight organic mixture, is widely used in dentistry for forming moulds of teeth. Hydrophilicity is an important property for DW, as a wet dental investment is used to surround the wax before wax burnout is performed. However, recent attempts to improve the hydrophilicity of DW using a surfactant have resulted in the reduced mechanical properties of the dental investment, leading to the failure of the dental restoration. This study applied a non-thermal air atmospheric pressure plasma jet (AAPPJ) for DW surface treatment and investigated its effect on both DW hydrophilicity and the dental investment's mechanical properties. The results showed that the application of the AAPPJ significantly improved the hydrophilicity of the DW, and that the results were similar to that of cleaner-treated DW using commercially available products with surfactant. A surface chemical analysis indicated that the improvement of hydrophilicity was related to an increase in the number of oxygen-related bonds on the DW surface following the removal of carbon hydrate in both AAPPJ and cleaner-treated DW. However, cleaner treatment compromised the mechanical property of the dental investment when the dental investment was in contact with the treated DW, while the AAPPJ treatment did not. Therefore, the use of AAPPJ to treat DW is a promising method for accurate dental restoration, as it induces an improvement in hydrophilicity without harming the dental investment.",
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Development of hydrophilic dental wax without surfactant using a non-thermal air atmospheric pressure plasma jet. / Lee, Jung Hwan; Kim, Yong Hee; Choi, Eun Ha; Kim, Kwang Mahn; Kim, Kyoung Nam.

In: Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics, Vol. 47, No. 23, 235402, 11.06.2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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