Diabetes and mortality in patients with prostate cancer: a meta-analysis

Junga Lee, Edward Giovannucci, Justin Y. Jeon

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: There are conflicting results as to the association between pre-existing diabetes and the risk of mortality in patients with prostate cancer. The purpose of this study is to estimate the influence of pre-existing diabetes on prostate cancer-specific mortality and all-cause mortality. Methods: We searched PubMed and Embase to identify studies that investigated the association between pre-existing diabetes and risk of death among men with prostate cancer. Pooled risk estimates and 95 % confidence intervals were calculated using fixed-effects models or random-effects models. Heterogeneity tests were conducted between studies. Publication bias was analyzed by using the Egger’s test, Begg’s test, and the trim and fill method. Results: Of the 733 articles identified, 17 cohort studies that had 274,677 male patients were included in this meta-analysis. Pre-existing diabetes was associated with a 29 % increase in prostate cancer-specific mortality [relative risk (RR) 1.29, 95 % CI 1.22–1.38, I2 = 66.68 %], and with a 37 % increase in all-cause mortality (RR 1.37, 95 % CI 1.29–1.45, p < 0.01, I2 = 90.26 %). Additionally, in a subgroup analysis that was a type specific analysis focusing on type 2 diabetes and was conducted only with three cohort studies, pre-existing type 2 diabetes was associated with all-cause mortality (RR 2.01, 95 % CI 1.37–2.96, I2 = 95.55 %) and no significant association with prostate cancer-specific mortality was detected (RR 1.17, 95 % CI 0.96–1.42, I2 = 75.59 %). There was significant heterogeneity between studies and no publication bias was found. Conclusions: This meta-analysis suggests diabetes may result in a worse prognosis for men with prostate cancer. Considering heterogeneity between studies, additional studies should be conducted to confirm these findings, and to allow generalization regarding the influence that each type of diabetes has on prostate cancer mortality.

Original languageEnglish
Article number1548
JournalSpringerPlus
Volume5
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016 Dec 1

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Meta-Analysis
Prostatic Neoplasms
Mortality
Publication Bias
Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Cohort Studies
PubMed
Confidence Intervals

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • General

Cite this

@article{2f56614d84b24ef6b76d93c7d1dcabf9,
title = "Diabetes and mortality in patients with prostate cancer: a meta-analysis",
abstract = "Background: There are conflicting results as to the association between pre-existing diabetes and the risk of mortality in patients with prostate cancer. The purpose of this study is to estimate the influence of pre-existing diabetes on prostate cancer-specific mortality and all-cause mortality. Methods: We searched PubMed and Embase to identify studies that investigated the association between pre-existing diabetes and risk of death among men with prostate cancer. Pooled risk estimates and 95 {\%} confidence intervals were calculated using fixed-effects models or random-effects models. Heterogeneity tests were conducted between studies. Publication bias was analyzed by using the Egger’s test, Begg’s test, and the trim and fill method. Results: Of the 733 articles identified, 17 cohort studies that had 274,677 male patients were included in this meta-analysis. Pre-existing diabetes was associated with a 29 {\%} increase in prostate cancer-specific mortality [relative risk (RR) 1.29, 95 {\%} CI 1.22–1.38, I2 = 66.68 {\%}], and with a 37 {\%} increase in all-cause mortality (RR 1.37, 95 {\%} CI 1.29–1.45, p < 0.01, I2 = 90.26 {\%}). Additionally, in a subgroup analysis that was a type specific analysis focusing on type 2 diabetes and was conducted only with three cohort studies, pre-existing type 2 diabetes was associated with all-cause mortality (RR 2.01, 95 {\%} CI 1.37–2.96, I2 = 95.55 {\%}) and no significant association with prostate cancer-specific mortality was detected (RR 1.17, 95 {\%} CI 0.96–1.42, I2 = 75.59 {\%}). There was significant heterogeneity between studies and no publication bias was found. Conclusions: This meta-analysis suggests diabetes may result in a worse prognosis for men with prostate cancer. Considering heterogeneity between studies, additional studies should be conducted to confirm these findings, and to allow generalization regarding the influence that each type of diabetes has on prostate cancer mortality.",
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Diabetes and mortality in patients with prostate cancer : a meta-analysis. / Lee, Junga; Giovannucci, Edward; Jeon, Justin Y.

In: SpringerPlus, Vol. 5, No. 1, 1548, 01.12.2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

TY - JOUR

T1 - Diabetes and mortality in patients with prostate cancer

T2 - a meta-analysis

AU - Lee, Junga

AU - Giovannucci, Edward

AU - Jeon, Justin Y.

PY - 2016/12/1

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N2 - Background: There are conflicting results as to the association between pre-existing diabetes and the risk of mortality in patients with prostate cancer. The purpose of this study is to estimate the influence of pre-existing diabetes on prostate cancer-specific mortality and all-cause mortality. Methods: We searched PubMed and Embase to identify studies that investigated the association between pre-existing diabetes and risk of death among men with prostate cancer. Pooled risk estimates and 95 % confidence intervals were calculated using fixed-effects models or random-effects models. Heterogeneity tests were conducted between studies. Publication bias was analyzed by using the Egger’s test, Begg’s test, and the trim and fill method. Results: Of the 733 articles identified, 17 cohort studies that had 274,677 male patients were included in this meta-analysis. Pre-existing diabetes was associated with a 29 % increase in prostate cancer-specific mortality [relative risk (RR) 1.29, 95 % CI 1.22–1.38, I2 = 66.68 %], and with a 37 % increase in all-cause mortality (RR 1.37, 95 % CI 1.29–1.45, p < 0.01, I2 = 90.26 %). Additionally, in a subgroup analysis that was a type specific analysis focusing on type 2 diabetes and was conducted only with three cohort studies, pre-existing type 2 diabetes was associated with all-cause mortality (RR 2.01, 95 % CI 1.37–2.96, I2 = 95.55 %) and no significant association with prostate cancer-specific mortality was detected (RR 1.17, 95 % CI 0.96–1.42, I2 = 75.59 %). There was significant heterogeneity between studies and no publication bias was found. Conclusions: This meta-analysis suggests diabetes may result in a worse prognosis for men with prostate cancer. Considering heterogeneity between studies, additional studies should be conducted to confirm these findings, and to allow generalization regarding the influence that each type of diabetes has on prostate cancer mortality.

AB - Background: There are conflicting results as to the association between pre-existing diabetes and the risk of mortality in patients with prostate cancer. The purpose of this study is to estimate the influence of pre-existing diabetes on prostate cancer-specific mortality and all-cause mortality. Methods: We searched PubMed and Embase to identify studies that investigated the association between pre-existing diabetes and risk of death among men with prostate cancer. Pooled risk estimates and 95 % confidence intervals were calculated using fixed-effects models or random-effects models. Heterogeneity tests were conducted between studies. Publication bias was analyzed by using the Egger’s test, Begg’s test, and the trim and fill method. Results: Of the 733 articles identified, 17 cohort studies that had 274,677 male patients were included in this meta-analysis. Pre-existing diabetes was associated with a 29 % increase in prostate cancer-specific mortality [relative risk (RR) 1.29, 95 % CI 1.22–1.38, I2 = 66.68 %], and with a 37 % increase in all-cause mortality (RR 1.37, 95 % CI 1.29–1.45, p < 0.01, I2 = 90.26 %). Additionally, in a subgroup analysis that was a type specific analysis focusing on type 2 diabetes and was conducted only with three cohort studies, pre-existing type 2 diabetes was associated with all-cause mortality (RR 2.01, 95 % CI 1.37–2.96, I2 = 95.55 %) and no significant association with prostate cancer-specific mortality was detected (RR 1.17, 95 % CI 0.96–1.42, I2 = 75.59 %). There was significant heterogeneity between studies and no publication bias was found. Conclusions: This meta-analysis suggests diabetes may result in a worse prognosis for men with prostate cancer. Considering heterogeneity between studies, additional studies should be conducted to confirm these findings, and to allow generalization regarding the influence that each type of diabetes has on prostate cancer mortality.

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