Difficulty-related changes in inter-regional neural synchrony are dissociated between target and non-target processing

Jeong Woo Choi, Kwang Su Cha, Jong Doo Choi, Ki Young Jung, Kyunghwan Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The major purpose of this study was to explore the changes in the local/global gamma-band neural synchronies during target/non-target processing due to task difficulty under an auditory three-stimulus oddball paradigm. Multichannel event-related potentials (ERPs) were recorded from fifteen healthy participants during the oddball task. In addition to the conventional ERP analysis, we investigated the modulations in gamma-band activity (GBA) and inter-regional gamma-band phase synchrony (GBPS) for infrequent target and non-target processing due to task difficulty. The most notable finding was that the difficulty-related changes in inter-regional GBPS (33-35 Hz) at P300 epoch (350-600 ms) completely differed for target and non-target processing. As task difficulty increased, the GBPS significantly reduced for target processing but increased for non-target processing. This result contrasts with the local neural synchrony in gamma-bands, which was not affected by task difficulty. Another major finding was that the spatial patterns of functional connectivity were dissociated for target and non-target processing with regard to the difficult task. The spatial pattern for target processing was compatible with the top-down attention network, whereas that for the non-target corresponded to the bottom-up attention network. Overall, we found that the inter-regional gamma-band neural synchronies during target/non-target processing change significantly with task difficulty and that this change is dissociated between target and non-target processing. Our results indicate that large-scale neural synchrony is more relevant for the difference in information processing between target and non-target stimuli.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)114-123
Number of pages10
JournalBrain Research
Volume1603
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015 Apr 7

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Evoked Potentials
Automatic Data Processing
Healthy Volunteers

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Molecular Biology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Developmental Biology

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Choi, Jeong Woo ; Cha, Kwang Su ; Choi, Jong Doo ; Jung, Ki Young ; Kim, Kyunghwan. / Difficulty-related changes in inter-regional neural synchrony are dissociated between target and non-target processing. In: Brain Research. 2015 ; Vol. 1603. pp. 114-123.
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Difficulty-related changes in inter-regional neural synchrony are dissociated between target and non-target processing. / Choi, Jeong Woo; Cha, Kwang Su; Choi, Jong Doo; Jung, Ki Young; Kim, Kyunghwan.

In: Brain Research, Vol. 1603, 07.04.2015, p. 114-123.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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