Do hospital characteristics influence Cesarean delivery? Analysis of National Health Insurance claim data

Kyu Tae Han, Seung Ju Kim, Yeong Jun Ju, Jong Won Choi, Euncheol Park

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Background The rates of Cesarean delivery in South Korea are high among the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development countries. We analyzed the relationship between hospital characteristics, in particular hospital volume and market competition and Cesarean delivery. Methods We used data from National Health Insurance claims (n = 53 591) at 51 hospitals to analyze the relationship between hospital characteristics and Cesarean delivery between 2010 and 2013. We performed logistic regression analysis using generalized estimating equations models that included both inpatient and hospital variables to examine factors associated with Cesarean delivery Results Among 53 591 hospitalization cases, 14 425 (26.9%) patients underwent Cesarean delivery. Hospital volumes for deliveries were inversely associated with Cesarean delivery (per increases 100 deliveries = OR 0.896, 95% CI 0.887-0.905). Market competition had inverse relationship with Cesarean delivery (per increase in 10 Hirschmann-Herfindal index points; OR 0.982, 95% CI 0.979-0.985). Conclusions Our findings suggest that hospital characteristics affect Cesarean delivery. These situations might be caused by maintaining profit with regard to survival or competition, and protecting themselves against unexpected delivery risks. Therefore, based on our findings, health policy makers must make an effort to implement effective strategies for the optimal management of excessive Cesarean rates in South Korea.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)801-807
Number of pages7
JournalEuropean Journal of Public Health
Volume27
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017 Oct 1

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National Health Programs
Republic of Korea
Health Policy
Administrative Personnel
Inpatients
Hospitalization
Logistic Models
Regression Analysis
Survival

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Han, Kyu Tae ; Kim, Seung Ju ; Ju, Yeong Jun ; Choi, Jong Won ; Park, Euncheol. / Do hospital characteristics influence Cesarean delivery? Analysis of National Health Insurance claim data. In: European Journal of Public Health. 2017 ; Vol. 27, No. 5. pp. 801-807.
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Do hospital characteristics influence Cesarean delivery? Analysis of National Health Insurance claim data. / Han, Kyu Tae; Kim, Seung Ju; Ju, Yeong Jun; Choi, Jong Won; Park, Euncheol.

In: European Journal of Public Health, Vol. 27, No. 5, 01.10.2017, p. 801-807.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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