Does a carbon ion-implanted surface reduce the restenosis rate of coronary stents? Comparison of in-stent restenosis and inflammatory reaction of a carbon ion-implanted stent versus a standard unimplanted stent

Jae Hun Jung, Pil Ki Min, Jong Youn Kim, Sungha Park, Eui Young Choi, Young Guk Ko, Donghoon Choi, Yangsoo Jang, Won Heum Shim, Seung Yun Cho

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4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Neointimal hyperplasia and resulting restenosis limit the long-term success of coronary stenting. Heavy metal ions induce an inflammatory and allergic reaction, and result in in-stent restenosis. However, a carbon ion-implanted surface might prevent heavy metal ions from diffusing into surrounding tissue. Methods: 140 lesions in 140 patients with coronary lesions underwent implantation of carbon-implanted surface stents (Arthos inert stent group, n = 70) or control stents (Arthos stent group, n = 70). The primary end point was the instent restenosis and the secondary end point was the value of hs-CRP at 48 h and 6 months after coronary stenting. Clinical and angiographic follow-ups were performed at 6 months. Results: The rate of in-stent restenosis was lower in the Arthosinert stent group (15.9%, 10/63) than in the Arthos stent group (20.9%, 13/62), but there were no significant differences between both groups (p = 0.56). The value of hs-CRP at 48 h was lower in the Arthosinert stent group (13.9 ± 13.4 mg/dl) than in the Arthos stent group (24.5 ± 26.0 mg/dl) with significant differences (p = 0.04). However, the differences between two groups were not statistically significant at 6 months (p = 0.76). Conclusions: As compared with a standard coronary stent, a carbon ion-implanted stent shows no considerable benefit for the prevention of instent restenosis within the range of this study. Despite all the limitations of this study, a positive effect of a carbon ion-implanted stent in reducing inflammatory reaction after coronary revascularization seems likely.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)72-75
Number of pages4
JournalCardiology
Volume104
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2005 Sep 2

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Pharmacology (medical)

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