Does chemotherapy really affect the quality of life of women with breast cancer?

Sook Yeon Hwang, Sun Ju Chang, Byeongwoo Park

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

34 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: The aims of this cross-sectional study were to explore and evaluate the impact of adjuvant chemotherapy on quality of life in breast cancer patients according to the survival time from surgery. Methods: Completed questionnaires were collected from 534 women with breast cancer. Clinical and sociodemographic characteristics were reviewed and Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Breast cancer instrument, global quality of life, Beck Depression Inventory, and unmet sexuality needs were administered. Descriptive statistics, t-tests, chi-square tests and multiple analysis of covariance were performed while controlling for confounding variables. Results: Statistically significant differences were found between chemotherapy and no chemotherapy group on depression (p=0.026), unmet sexuality needs (p=0.010), breast cancer specific concerns (p=0.010), physical well-being (p=0.001), and emotional well-being (p=0.028). Chemotherapy effects also varied according to survival time since surgery such as for group 1 (<1 year since surgery), significant differences were found on Beck Depression Inventory (p=0.042), unmet sexuality needs (p=0.016), breast cancer subscale (p=0.004), and physical well-being (p=0.016) and for group 3 (>3 years since surgery) on depression (p=0.019) and physical well-being (p=0.028) respectively; however, there were no significant differences between chemotherapy and no chemotherapy group for group 2 (1-3 years since surgery). Conclusion: As expected, breast cancer patients who underwent adjuvant chemotherapy experienced significantly worse quality of life than those who did not receive chemotherapy. Furthermore, the adverse chemotherapy effects on the quality of life appear to vary according to the time since surgery. These results suggest that health care professionals may need to address long-term as well as short-term chemotherapy side-effects and intervene accordingly to enhance quality of life of breast cancer patients.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)229-235
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Breast Cancer
Volume16
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013 Jun 1

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Quality of Life
Breast Neoplasms
Drug Therapy
Sexuality
Adjuvant Chemotherapy
Depression
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Survival
Chi-Square Distribution
Cross-Sectional Studies
Delivery of Health Care
Equipment and Supplies

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

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title = "Does chemotherapy really affect the quality of life of women with breast cancer?",
abstract = "Purpose: The aims of this cross-sectional study were to explore and evaluate the impact of adjuvant chemotherapy on quality of life in breast cancer patients according to the survival time from surgery. Methods: Completed questionnaires were collected from 534 women with breast cancer. Clinical and sociodemographic characteristics were reviewed and Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Breast cancer instrument, global quality of life, Beck Depression Inventory, and unmet sexuality needs were administered. Descriptive statistics, t-tests, chi-square tests and multiple analysis of covariance were performed while controlling for confounding variables. Results: Statistically significant differences were found between chemotherapy and no chemotherapy group on depression (p=0.026), unmet sexuality needs (p=0.010), breast cancer specific concerns (p=0.010), physical well-being (p=0.001), and emotional well-being (p=0.028). Chemotherapy effects also varied according to survival time since surgery such as for group 1 (<1 year since surgery), significant differences were found on Beck Depression Inventory (p=0.042), unmet sexuality needs (p=0.016), breast cancer subscale (p=0.004), and physical well-being (p=0.016) and for group 3 (>3 years since surgery) on depression (p=0.019) and physical well-being (p=0.028) respectively; however, there were no significant differences between chemotherapy and no chemotherapy group for group 2 (1-3 years since surgery). Conclusion: As expected, breast cancer patients who underwent adjuvant chemotherapy experienced significantly worse quality of life than those who did not receive chemotherapy. Furthermore, the adverse chemotherapy effects on the quality of life appear to vary according to the time since surgery. These results suggest that health care professionals may need to address long-term as well as short-term chemotherapy side-effects and intervene accordingly to enhance quality of life of breast cancer patients.",
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Does chemotherapy really affect the quality of life of women with breast cancer? / Hwang, Sook Yeon; Chang, Sun Ju; Park, Byeongwoo.

In: Journal of Breast Cancer, Vol. 16, No. 2, 01.06.2013, p. 229-235.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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N2 - Purpose: The aims of this cross-sectional study were to explore and evaluate the impact of adjuvant chemotherapy on quality of life in breast cancer patients according to the survival time from surgery. Methods: Completed questionnaires were collected from 534 women with breast cancer. Clinical and sociodemographic characteristics were reviewed and Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Breast cancer instrument, global quality of life, Beck Depression Inventory, and unmet sexuality needs were administered. Descriptive statistics, t-tests, chi-square tests and multiple analysis of covariance were performed while controlling for confounding variables. Results: Statistically significant differences were found between chemotherapy and no chemotherapy group on depression (p=0.026), unmet sexuality needs (p=0.010), breast cancer specific concerns (p=0.010), physical well-being (p=0.001), and emotional well-being (p=0.028). Chemotherapy effects also varied according to survival time since surgery such as for group 1 (<1 year since surgery), significant differences were found on Beck Depression Inventory (p=0.042), unmet sexuality needs (p=0.016), breast cancer subscale (p=0.004), and physical well-being (p=0.016) and for group 3 (>3 years since surgery) on depression (p=0.019) and physical well-being (p=0.028) respectively; however, there were no significant differences between chemotherapy and no chemotherapy group for group 2 (1-3 years since surgery). Conclusion: As expected, breast cancer patients who underwent adjuvant chemotherapy experienced significantly worse quality of life than those who did not receive chemotherapy. Furthermore, the adverse chemotherapy effects on the quality of life appear to vary according to the time since surgery. These results suggest that health care professionals may need to address long-term as well as short-term chemotherapy side-effects and intervene accordingly to enhance quality of life of breast cancer patients.

AB - Purpose: The aims of this cross-sectional study were to explore and evaluate the impact of adjuvant chemotherapy on quality of life in breast cancer patients according to the survival time from surgery. Methods: Completed questionnaires were collected from 534 women with breast cancer. Clinical and sociodemographic characteristics were reviewed and Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Breast cancer instrument, global quality of life, Beck Depression Inventory, and unmet sexuality needs were administered. Descriptive statistics, t-tests, chi-square tests and multiple analysis of covariance were performed while controlling for confounding variables. Results: Statistically significant differences were found between chemotherapy and no chemotherapy group on depression (p=0.026), unmet sexuality needs (p=0.010), breast cancer specific concerns (p=0.010), physical well-being (p=0.001), and emotional well-being (p=0.028). Chemotherapy effects also varied according to survival time since surgery such as for group 1 (<1 year since surgery), significant differences were found on Beck Depression Inventory (p=0.042), unmet sexuality needs (p=0.016), breast cancer subscale (p=0.004), and physical well-being (p=0.016) and for group 3 (>3 years since surgery) on depression (p=0.019) and physical well-being (p=0.028) respectively; however, there were no significant differences between chemotherapy and no chemotherapy group for group 2 (1-3 years since surgery). Conclusion: As expected, breast cancer patients who underwent adjuvant chemotherapy experienced significantly worse quality of life than those who did not receive chemotherapy. Furthermore, the adverse chemotherapy effects on the quality of life appear to vary according to the time since surgery. These results suggest that health care professionals may need to address long-term as well as short-term chemotherapy side-effects and intervene accordingly to enhance quality of life of breast cancer patients.

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