Does hospital need more hospice beds? Hospital charges and length of stays by lung cancer inpatients at their end of life: A retrospective cohort design of 2002-2012

Sun Jung Kim, Kyu Tae Han, Tae Hyun Kim, Euncheol Park

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Previous studies found that hospice and palliative care reduces healthcare costs for end-of-life cancer patients. Aim: To investigate hospital inpatient charges and length-of-stay differences by availability of hospice care beds within hospitals using nationwide data from end-of-life inpatients with lung cancer. Design: A retrospective cohort study was performed using nationwide lung cancer health insurance claims from 2002 to 2012 in Korea. Setting and participants: Descriptive and multi-level (patient-level and hospital-level) mixed models were used to compare inpatient charges and lengths of stay. Using 673,122 inpatient health insurance claims, we obtained aggregated hospital inpatient charges and lengths of stay from a total of 114,828 inpatients and 866 hospital records. Results: Hospital inpatient charges and length of stay drastically increased as patients approached death; a significant portion of hospital inpatient charges and lengths of stay occurred during the end-of-life period. According to our multi-level analysis, hospitals with hospice care beds tend to have significantly lower end-of-life hospital inpatient charges; however, length of stay did not differ. Hospitals with more hospice care beds were associated with reduction in hospital inpatient charges within 3 months before death. Conclusion: Higher end-of-life healthcare hospital charges were found for lung cancer inpatients who were admitted to hospitals without hospice care beds. This study suggests that health policy-makers and the National Health Insurance program need to consider expanding the use of hospice care beds within hospitals and hospice care facilities for end-of-life patients with lung cancer in South Korea, where very limited numbers of resources are currently available.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)808-816
Number of pages9
JournalPalliative Medicine
Volume29
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015 Jan 1

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Hospital Charges
Hospices
Inpatients
Length of Stay
Lung Neoplasms
Hospice Care
National Health Programs
Health Insurance
Republic of Korea
Hospital Records
Korea
Health Policy
Administrative Personnel
Palliative Care
Health Care Costs
Cohort Studies
Retrospective Studies

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

Cite this

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title = "Does hospital need more hospice beds? Hospital charges and length of stays by lung cancer inpatients at their end of life: A retrospective cohort design of 2002-2012",
abstract = "Background: Previous studies found that hospice and palliative care reduces healthcare costs for end-of-life cancer patients. Aim: To investigate hospital inpatient charges and length-of-stay differences by availability of hospice care beds within hospitals using nationwide data from end-of-life inpatients with lung cancer. Design: A retrospective cohort study was performed using nationwide lung cancer health insurance claims from 2002 to 2012 in Korea. Setting and participants: Descriptive and multi-level (patient-level and hospital-level) mixed models were used to compare inpatient charges and lengths of stay. Using 673,122 inpatient health insurance claims, we obtained aggregated hospital inpatient charges and lengths of stay from a total of 114,828 inpatients and 866 hospital records. Results: Hospital inpatient charges and length of stay drastically increased as patients approached death; a significant portion of hospital inpatient charges and lengths of stay occurred during the end-of-life period. According to our multi-level analysis, hospitals with hospice care beds tend to have significantly lower end-of-life hospital inpatient charges; however, length of stay did not differ. Hospitals with more hospice care beds were associated with reduction in hospital inpatient charges within 3 months before death. Conclusion: Higher end-of-life healthcare hospital charges were found for lung cancer inpatients who were admitted to hospitals without hospice care beds. This study suggests that health policy-makers and the National Health Insurance program need to consider expanding the use of hospice care beds within hospitals and hospice care facilities for end-of-life patients with lung cancer in South Korea, where very limited numbers of resources are currently available.",
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Does hospital need more hospice beds? Hospital charges and length of stays by lung cancer inpatients at their end of life : A retrospective cohort design of 2002-2012. / Kim, Sun Jung; Han, Kyu Tae; Kim, Tae Hyun; Park, Euncheol.

In: Palliative Medicine, Vol. 29, No. 9, 01.01.2015, p. 808-816.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

TY - JOUR

T1 - Does hospital need more hospice beds? Hospital charges and length of stays by lung cancer inpatients at their end of life

T2 - A retrospective cohort design of 2002-2012

AU - Kim, Sun Jung

AU - Han, Kyu Tae

AU - Kim, Tae Hyun

AU - Park, Euncheol

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N2 - Background: Previous studies found that hospice and palliative care reduces healthcare costs for end-of-life cancer patients. Aim: To investigate hospital inpatient charges and length-of-stay differences by availability of hospice care beds within hospitals using nationwide data from end-of-life inpatients with lung cancer. Design: A retrospective cohort study was performed using nationwide lung cancer health insurance claims from 2002 to 2012 in Korea. Setting and participants: Descriptive and multi-level (patient-level and hospital-level) mixed models were used to compare inpatient charges and lengths of stay. Using 673,122 inpatient health insurance claims, we obtained aggregated hospital inpatient charges and lengths of stay from a total of 114,828 inpatients and 866 hospital records. Results: Hospital inpatient charges and length of stay drastically increased as patients approached death; a significant portion of hospital inpatient charges and lengths of stay occurred during the end-of-life period. According to our multi-level analysis, hospitals with hospice care beds tend to have significantly lower end-of-life hospital inpatient charges; however, length of stay did not differ. Hospitals with more hospice care beds were associated with reduction in hospital inpatient charges within 3 months before death. Conclusion: Higher end-of-life healthcare hospital charges were found for lung cancer inpatients who were admitted to hospitals without hospice care beds. This study suggests that health policy-makers and the National Health Insurance program need to consider expanding the use of hospice care beds within hospitals and hospice care facilities for end-of-life patients with lung cancer in South Korea, where very limited numbers of resources are currently available.

AB - Background: Previous studies found that hospice and palliative care reduces healthcare costs for end-of-life cancer patients. Aim: To investigate hospital inpatient charges and length-of-stay differences by availability of hospice care beds within hospitals using nationwide data from end-of-life inpatients with lung cancer. Design: A retrospective cohort study was performed using nationwide lung cancer health insurance claims from 2002 to 2012 in Korea. Setting and participants: Descriptive and multi-level (patient-level and hospital-level) mixed models were used to compare inpatient charges and lengths of stay. Using 673,122 inpatient health insurance claims, we obtained aggregated hospital inpatient charges and lengths of stay from a total of 114,828 inpatients and 866 hospital records. Results: Hospital inpatient charges and length of stay drastically increased as patients approached death; a significant portion of hospital inpatient charges and lengths of stay occurred during the end-of-life period. According to our multi-level analysis, hospitals with hospice care beds tend to have significantly lower end-of-life hospital inpatient charges; however, length of stay did not differ. Hospitals with more hospice care beds were associated with reduction in hospital inpatient charges within 3 months before death. Conclusion: Higher end-of-life healthcare hospital charges were found for lung cancer inpatients who were admitted to hospitals without hospice care beds. This study suggests that health policy-makers and the National Health Insurance program need to consider expanding the use of hospice care beds within hospitals and hospice care facilities for end-of-life patients with lung cancer in South Korea, where very limited numbers of resources are currently available.

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