Does Media Coverage of a Celebrity Suicide Trigger Copycat Suicides? Evidence from Korean Cases

Yun Jeong Choi, Hyungna Oh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

ABSTRACT: This article investigates the link between media coverage of celebrity suicides and the nation’s suicide rate. The instrumental variable regression is applied to suicide data from Statistics Korea and the media coverage data on celebrity suicides from Mediagaon of the Korea Press Foundation during the period from 1997 to 2009. The estimation results demonstrate that Korean celebrity suicides have significantly increased suicide rates, whereas non-Korean celebrity suicides have not. Moreover, greater media coverage of Korean celebrity suicides is associated with an increase in suicide rates. These findings shed light on the importance of media policy in the prevention of copycat suicides.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)92-105
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Media Economics
Volume29
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016 Apr 2

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VIP
suicide
coverage
Statistics
suicide rate
evidence
Korea
media policy
Media coverage
Celebrity
Suicide
Trigger
statistics
regression

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Communication
  • Economics and Econometrics

Cite this

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Does Media Coverage of a Celebrity Suicide Trigger Copycat Suicides? Evidence from Korean Cases. / Choi, Yun Jeong; Oh, Hyungna.

In: Journal of Media Economics, Vol. 29, No. 2, 02.04.2016, p. 92-105.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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