Does political ideology matter in online salience? evidence from social media use by members of the Korean national assembly

Sun Hyoung Kim, Sounman Hong

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In this article, we test whether politicians' ideological positions are associated with their online salience. Using the social media activities of members of the Korean National Assembly, we support the notion that ideologically extreme or distinct politicians may benefit more from using new information technology. We then propose and test two different hypotheses that may explain why this is so. The first, the so-called supply-side explanation, explains that ideologically distinct politicians benefit more because they rely more on these new technologies. The second, the so-called demand-side explanation, is that ideologically distinct politicians benefit more from their use of these technologies than those with moderate views, even if the level of their activities is the same. Our empirical results support both hypotheses, although to a different extent.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationdg.o 2015 - Proceedings of the 16th Annual International Conference on Digital Government Research
Subtitle of host publicationDigital Government and Wicked Problems: Climate Change, Urbanization, and Inequality
EditorsJing Zhang, Yushim Kim
PublisherAssociation for Computing Machinery
Pages197-203
Number of pages7
ISBN (Electronic)9781450336000
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015 May 27
Event16th Annual International Conference on Digital Government Research, dg.o 2015 - Phoenix, United States
Duration: 2015 May 272015 May 30

Publication series

NameACM International Conference Proceeding Series
Volume27-30-May-2015

Other

Other16th Annual International Conference on Digital Government Research, dg.o 2015
CountryUnited States
CityPhoenix
Period15/5/2715/5/30

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Software
  • Human-Computer Interaction
  • Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition
  • Computer Networks and Communications

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    Kim, S. H., & Hong, S. (2015). Does political ideology matter in online salience? evidence from social media use by members of the Korean national assembly. In J. Zhang, & Y. Kim (Eds.), dg.o 2015 - Proceedings of the 16th Annual International Conference on Digital Government Research: Digital Government and Wicked Problems: Climate Change, Urbanization, and Inequality (pp. 197-203). (ACM International Conference Proceeding Series; Vol. 27-30-May-2015). Association for Computing Machinery. https://doi.org/10.1145/2757401.2757415