Does representative bureacracy improve public service performance? Evidence from an instrumental variable approach

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

This study finds that an increase in the share of ethnic minority officers in a given force is associated with a decrease in the number of crimes in the area under the force's jurisdiction during the 10-year period.

Original languageEnglish
Pages165-170
Number of pages6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015 Jan 1
Event75th Annual Meeting of the Academy of Management, AOM 2015 - Vancouver, Canada
Duration: 2015 Aug 72015 Aug 11

Other

Other75th Annual Meeting of the Academy of Management, AOM 2015
CountryCanada
CityVancouver
Period15/8/715/8/11

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Management Information Systems
  • Management of Technology and Innovation
  • Industrial relations

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  • Cite this

    Hong, S. (2015). Does representative bureacracy improve public service performance? Evidence from an instrumental variable approach. 165-170. Paper presented at 75th Annual Meeting of the Academy of Management, AOM 2015, Vancouver, Canada. https://doi.org/10.5465/AMBPP.2015.235