Does Social Interaction Matter Psychological Well-Being in Persons with Dementia?

Kyung Hee Lee, Marie Boltz, Hana Lee, Donna L. Algase

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Social interaction between residents and staff is an important factor influencing sense of well-being. This study examined the relationship between staff-resident interactions and psychological well-being of persons with dementia. Methods: A total of 831 observations of 110 persons with dementia in 17 nursing homes and 6 assisted living facilities were included. Psychological well-being was measured by observed displays of positive and negative emotional expressions. Social interaction was determined by the type of social interaction (ie, verbal interaction, nonverbal interaction, and both verbal and nonverbal interactions) and the quality of interaction (ie, positive, negative, and neutral). Results: Verbal or both verbal and nonverbal interactions showed significant relationship with positive and negative emotional expressions. Positive interaction was significantly associated with more positive emotional expression, whereas negative interaction was not. Conclusion: Staff-resident interactions are important to promote the psychological well-being of persons with dementia in residential care.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)207-212
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Alzheimer's Disease and other Dementias
Volume32
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017 Jun 1

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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