Does the use of orthoses improve self-reported pain and function measures in patients with plantar fasciitis? A meta-analysis

Sae Yong Lee, Patrick McKeon, Jay Hertel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

57 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: To perform a meta-analysis examining the effects of foot orthoses on self-reported pain and function in patients with plantar fasciitis. Data Sources: MEDLINE, SPORTDiscus, and CINAHL were searched from their inception until December 2007 using the terms "foot", "plantar fascia", "arch", "orthotic", "orthoses" and "plantar fasciitis". Study Selection: Original research studies which met these criteria were included: (1) randomised controlled trials or prospective cohort designs, (2) the patients had to be suffering from plantar fasciitis at the time of recruitment, (3) evaluated the efficacy of foot orthoses with self-reported pain and/or function, (4) means, standard deviations, and sample size of each group had to be reported. Results: We utilised the Roos, Engstrom, and Soderberg (Roos, E., Engstrom, M., & Soderberg, B. (2006). Foot orthoses for the treatment of plantar fasciitis. Foot and Ankle International, 8, 606-611) night splint condition to compare our pooled orthoses results. The meta-analysis results showed significant reductions in pain after orthotic intervention. The Roos et al.' (Roos, E., Engstrom, M., & Soderberg, B. (2006). Foot orthoses for the treatment of plantar fasciitis. Foot and Ankle International, 8, 606-611) study also showed significant reduction in pain after night splint treatment. The meta-analysis results also showed significant increases in function after orthotic use. In contrast, the Roos et al.' (Roos, E., Engstrom, M., & Soderberg, B. (2006). Foot orthoses for the treatment of plantar fasciitis. Foot and Ankle International, 8, 606-611) study did not show a significant increase in function after night splinting for 12 weeks. Conclusion: The use of foot orthoses in patients with plantar fasciitis appears to be associated with reduced pain and increased function.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)12-18
Number of pages7
JournalPhysical Therapy in Sport
Volume10
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009 Feb 1

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

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