Dose optimization of fractionated external radiation and high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy for FIGO stage IB uterine cervical carcinoma

Sang Wook Lee, Chang Ok Suh, Eun Ji Chung, Gwi Eon Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: To determine the optimal dose combination scheme of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and high-dose-rate (HDR) intracavitary radiation (ICR) for maximizing tumor control while conferring an acceptable late complication rate in the treatment of Stage IB uterine cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively analyzed 162 patients with International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) Stage IB squamous cell carcinoma of the uterine cervix who received definitive RT between May 1979 and December 1990. Before HDR-ICR, all patients received EBRT to a total dose of 40-46 Gy (median 45), administered during 4-5 weeks to the whole pelvis. HDR-ICR was given 3 times weeks to a total dose of 24-51 Gy (median 39) at point A, using a dose of 3 Gy/fraction. Central shielding from EBRT was begun after the delivery using 20-45 Gy (median 40) of the external dose. The total dose to point A, calculated by adding the EBRT biologically effective dose (BED) and the ICR BED to point A, was 74.1-118.1 Gy (mean 95.2). The rectal point dose was calculated at the anterior rectal wall at the level of the cervical os. The local control rate, survival rate, and late complication rate were analyzed according to the irradiation dose and BED. Results: The initial complete response rate was 99.4%. The overall 5-year survival rate and 5-year disease-free survival rate was 91.1% and 90.9%, respectively. The local failure rate was 4.9%, and the distant failure rate was 4.3%. Late complications were mild and occurred in 23.5% of patients, with 18.5% presenting with rectal complications and 4.9% with bladder complications. The mean rectal BED (the sum of the external midline BED and the ICR rectal point BED) was lower in the patients without rectal complications than in those with rectal complications (125.6 Gy vs. 142.7 Gy, p = 0.3210). The late rectal complication rate increased when the sum of the external midline BED and the rectal BED by ICR was ≥131 Gy (p = 0.1962). However, 5-year survival rates did not increase with the external midline BED (p = 0.4093). The late rectal complication rate also increased, without a change in the survival rate, when the sum of the external midline BED and the ICR point A BED was >90 Gy. Conclusion: In treating Stage IB carcinoma of the uterine cervix with HDR-ICR, using fractions of 3 Gy, it is crucial to keep the point A BED at ≤90 Gy to minimize late rectal complications without compromising the survival rate. To achieve this goal, appropriate central shielding from EBRT is needed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1338-1344
Number of pages7
JournalInternational Journal of Radiation Oncology Biology Physics
Volume52
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2002 Apr 1

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Radiation
  • Oncology
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Cancer Research

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